Intel Launches Expanded Initiative to Help Underserved Students, School Districts Overcome COVID-19 Barriers

Intel Education 2Intel has convened a partnership group with First Book to launch the Creating Learning Connections Initiative, which is designed to fuel education by supporting students in Title I-eligible school districts affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The program gives underserved students and educators access to critical tools and resources, including internet connectivity, technology devices and hands-on STEAM learning solutions. Additional partners involved in the initiative include CDW-G, LEGO® Education and the LEGO Foundation.

Recently, First Book released the results of a nationwide survey that shows 40% of children in the United States do not have reliable internet and almost 40% are without access to functioning devices. The closure of schools in response to the pandemic exacerbated an existing crisis in education for children in poverty, millions of whom do not have access to tools and resources that enable virtual learning.

As part of the initiative, Intel and CDW-G are providing a total of $5 million in personal computers, software, configuration services and digital learning resources. They are also providing stipends of $4,000 to each awarded district to set up home internet connectivity for kids in need. Underserved students in 17 states will receive support with nearly 15,000 devices being delivered to 45 school districts.

“COVID-19 has exacerbated the technology and educational inequities in communities of need. Now more than ever, it is critical that we come together with partners to combine our unique assets and capabilities to ensure that students have access to a meaningful virtual learning experience,” said Brian Gonzalez, senior director, Global Partnerships and Initiatives, Governments, Markets and Trade Group at Intel. “Earlier this year, we pledged $50 million with our Pandemic Response Technology Initiative, which included supporting online learning initiatives like this.”

The grant application process ran May 19 through June 5. Recipients have been notified and will work with First Book, Intel, CDW-G, LEGO® Education and the LEGO Foundation to identify the families and resources needed. Schools that were not selected will receive $500 from Intel for use at the First Book Marketplace to purchase new, high-quality books and educational resources for their students.

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Media Alert: Intel at DEF CON 28

Join Intel experts for panel discussions and talks at DEF CON 28, a virtual event taking place through this weekend. Learn how Intel, together with partners and customers, is building the trusted foundation for computing in a data-centric world.

DEF CON 28

When: Aug. 7-9, 2020

Where: Virtual Event

 

katie noble
Katie Noble

Building Connections across the Aviation Ecosystem

There is an increased effort to collaborate and coordinate to protect information technology and operational technology systems at airports, airlines, aviation management, and manufacturers and vendors via the supply chain. Katie Noble, director of PSIRT and Bug Bounty at Intel, moderates a panel of experts, including Randy Talley (CISA), Sidd Gejji (FAA), Al Burke (Department of Defense), Jen Ellis (Rapid7), Jeff Troy (Aviation ISAC) and John Craig (Boeing). They will share their insights and current activities among government, industry and the security research community.

When: Friday, Aug. 7, 1-2 p.m. PDT

Where: https://bit.ly/3gCsE6j

Registration: Free

anders fogh
Anders Fogh

katie noble
Katie Noble

The Joy of Coordinating Vulnerability Disclosure

Under the best of circumstances, coordinating vulnerability disclosures can be a challenge.  In a panel discussion moderated by Christopher “CRob” Robinson (Red Hat), Katie Noble, director of PSIRT and Bug Bounty at Intel, and Anders Fogh, senior principal engineer in the security division at Intel, join Lisa Bradley (Dell), Omar Santos (Cisco) and Daniel Gruss (TU Graz). They will share experiences and show how researchers and technology companies together can improve the impact of disclosing vulnerabilities within the technology ecosystem.

When: Friday, Aug. 7, 10:30-11:30 a.m. and 6:30-7:30 p.m. PDT

Where:  https://www.twitch.tv/redteamvillage (10:30 a.m. session); https://www.twitch.tv/iotvillage (6:30 p.m. session)

Registration: Free

amit elazari
Dr. Amit Elazari

anahit tarkhanyan
Anahit Tarkhanyan

The Future of IoT Security ‘Baselines,’ Standards and Regulatory Domain

Proposed initiatives and standards in IoT security are shaping the industry at a fast pace and on a global scale. In this talk, Dr. Amit Elazari, Intel director of global cybersecurity policy, and Anahit Tarkhanyan, Intel platform architect, will introduce a variety of regulatory concepts and baseline proposals that are shaping the future of IoT security. They’ll focus on recent trends, including NISTIR 8259, C2, international standards, supply chain transparency, researchers’ collaboration, proposed legislation, coordinated vulnerability disclosure and innovative capabilities that can support and enhance development from the foundation up.

When: Saturday, Aug. 8, 2:30-3:15 p.m. PDT

Where:  https://www.twitch.tv/iotvillage

Registration: Free

 

Contact:

Jennifer Foss
Intel
425-765-3485
Jennifer.foss@intel.com

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Intel and VMware Extend Virtualization to Radio Access Network for 5G

vmware 2x1 1Intel and VMware Inc. today announced a collaboration on an integrated software platform for virtualized radio access networks (RAN) to accelerate the rollout of both existing LTE and future 5G networks.

More: 5G & Wireless Communications News

As communications service providers (CoSPs) evolve their networks to support the rollout of future 5G networks, they are increasingly adopting a software-defined, virtualized infrastructure. Virtualization of the core network enables CoSPs to improve operational costs and bring services to market faster.

“Many CoSPs are choosing to extend the benefits of network virtualization into the RAN for increased agility as they roll out new 5G services, but the software integration can be rather complex. With the integrated vRAN platform, combined with leading technology and expertise from Intel and VMware, CoSPs are positioned to benefit from accelerated time to deployment of innovative services at the edge of their network,” said Dan Rodriguez, corporate vice president and general manager of the Network Platforms Group at Intel.

Specific use cases and the full news release can be found on VMware’s website.

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For Businesses to Succeed in 2030, Gen Z Says No One Can be Left Behind

genz 2x1 1What’s New: With Gen Z’s representation in the global workforce set to pass 1 billion by 2030, organizations need to understand the demographic group’s motivations and perspectives on critical issues such as diversity and inclusion. Intel commissioned a study in the U.K. to assess Gen Z’s expectations around diversity, their experiences of bias and how these will contribute to shaping their future career paths.

“As Gen Z employees enter the workforce, they are going to make their voice heard on the importance of diversity and inclusion. Many have personally experienced discrimination as a result of gender, ethnic background, disability or sexual orientation, and are seeking career opportunities that align with their ethics and social values. Companies must accelerate their efforts to create diverse, inclusive workplaces to meet the expectations of a generation who will be making career choices as much on values and sense of purpose as pay and progression.”
–Megan Stowe, director, EMEA Strategic Sourcing and International Supplier, Diversity & Inclusion at Intel

Why It Matters: The study found that a majority of Gen Z — those ages 18 to 24 — in the U.K. would be hesitant to take a job from a company that does not have diverse representation in senior leadership roles. In choosing between competing job offers, a company’s stance on diversity and inclusivity is almost as important as the pay offered.

Researchers surveyed 2,000 workers in the U.K. across a variety of age groups and compared the responses of Gen Z to those in other demographics.

What the Study Says: Diversity and inclusion have become essential workplace priorities: Diverse teams with diverse perspectives are more creative and innovative. It’s critical, now more than ever, to actively create and foster an environment that empowers employees to have confidence and bring their full experiences to work each day. This will continue to be driven by the expectations, experiences and needs of Gen Z employees as they enter the workforce.

The survey found a broad acceptance of the importance of diversity and inclusion across different age groups, but particularly strong opinions among members of Gen Z. The group is most likely to have more personal experiences of bias as a result of gender, ethnic background or disability, and use diversity and inclusion as a deciding factor in choosing between job offers. Key findings include:

  • Gen Z will make career choices based on diversity and inclusion. Over half (56%) of 18- to 24-year-olds said they would be hesitant to accept a job from an organization that does not have any underrepresented minorities in senior leadership roles.
  • Young people are more likely to have experienced bias. Among Gen Z, 39% have experienced bias as a result of gender, 31% personal appearance, 26% ethnic background and 21% sexual orientation. In all cases, these are higher figures than the average across all age groups.
  • Diversity and inclusion must be broadly based. Among all respondents, examples of diversity and inclusion at work cited as most important included having colleagues of all ages and levels of experience and backgrounds, as well as equal opportunities for those with disabilities. Gen Z especially emphasized the need for workplaces to be LGBTQ+ friendly.
  • Diversity delivers business value. Forty-two percent of respondents said diversity is important because it allows for greater wealth of experience and insights. Forty percent said it means people are placed first and no one is left behind.

Importance of a Mindset Shift: As they work to become more diverse and inclusive, businesses need to recognize the shift in mindsets that will follow Gen Z into the mainstream workforce. For this rising generation, values and ethics are on par with financial reward. Almost as many Gen Z respondents said they were worried about finding a job that aligns with their ethics and sense of purpose (33%) compared to a job that provides financial security (36%). Similarly, 34% of Gen Z would decide between similar job offers based on which is more diverse and inclusive, against 36% who would consider pay the deciding factor.

More Context: A diverse workforce and inclusive culture are key to Intel’s evolution and driving forces of its growth. This survey builds on the company’s recently announced 2030 goals and global impact challenges. The directive reinforces our commitment to advance diversity and inclusion across our global workforce and industry while also looking beyond our own walls: working with stakeholders to make technology fully inclusive and expand digital readiness worldwide.

Intel’s corporate responsibility and positive global impact work is embedded in its purpose to create world-changing technology that enriches the lives of every person on Earth. By leveraging its position in the technology ecosystem, Intel can help customers and partners achieve their own aspirations and accelerate progress on key topics across the technology industry.

Even More Context: Inclusion: The Deciding Factor (Study Report) | Intel 2030 Goals

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Taller than the Statue of Liberty: ‘Big Blue’ Helps Intel Expand D1X

Imagine a herd of 650 adult Asian elephants. Now imagine lifting that entire herd off the ground with one gigantic hoist. That’s the 2,600-ton capacity of one of the world’s biggest construction cranes — known to all who behold it as “Big Blue.” Intel uses the crane to place steel infrastructure for its D1X chip factory expansion in Hillsboro, Oregon.

Owned and operated by Kennewick, Washington-based Lampson International, Big Blue travels the globe to construction projects that need some of the world’s heaviest loads slung skyward. At 460 feet long, the crane’s main boom is 155 feet taller than New York’s Statue of Liberty.

In Hillsboro, where Big Blue arrived this spring disassembled on 100 semitrailer trucks, Intel is gearing up to meet the increasing market opportunity for its advanced chips that run everything from sprawling internet data centers to thin-and-powerful laptops.

At D1X, Big Blue began its big job on a pre-dawn morning this spring hoisting a 200-foot-long, 277-ton double-truss frame – the first of 46 that comprise the factory’s steel superstructure. In addition to the monster beams, the D1X expansion will be reinforced with 24,000 tons of rebar — twice the weight of the Eiffel Tower. Work on the D1X expansion involves more than 3,000 electricians, plumbers, welders and other trade workers, with physical distancing enforced across the job site.

Oregon, with its 21,000 Intel employees, is home to the company’s largest site.

More: All Intel Images | Global Manufacturing at Intel (Press Kit)

Intel D1X Crane 4

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Intel and Lenovo Research Finds Tech is Essential to Driving Global Diversity and Inclusion

intel lenovo di 2x1 1The first release of a new global research report from Intel and Lenovo finds that technology will play an integral role in achieving diversity and inclusion (D&I) in the workplace of the future. With the power to bridge accessibility gaps, connect people who are otherwise divided, and expand the benefits of upskilling and progressive training programs, tech is enabling people to work in more dynamic, flexible ways.

The study explores how people around the world view D&I in their personal and professional lives, and their perspective on the role technology plays to address systematic inequities, create more access and enable growth. Among the study’s findings:

  • In the U.S., parents are more likely than non-parents to view flexible work hours as a prominent impact of technology in the workplace by a 12-point margin.
  • Respondents from higher income brackets are more likely to agree that tech plays an “extremely large role” in improving diversity and inclusion in the workplace.
  • More than 80% of employees in Brazil and China agree that artificial intelligence can be used to make the workplace more diverse and inclusive, as do half of respondents in the U.S., U.K. and Germany.
  • More than half of global respondents say a company’s diversity and inclusion policies are “extremely” or “very” important when deciding where to apply and whether to accept an offer.

“Intel has a longstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion. We believe that transparency is key, and our goal is to see our representation mirror the markets and customers we serve. Just as we apply our engineering mindset to create the world’s leading technological innovations, we do the same with our D&I strategies, using data to inform our decisions and sharing it transparently to drive clear accountability and deliver results across the industry,” says Barbara Whye, chief diversity & inclusion officer and vice president of Social Impact and Human Resources at Intel. “We know that to truly progress D&I, it takes companies working together, and being a global company, this work can’t be limited to the U.S. only. That’s why with both companies sharing a rich history of collaboration, we decided to extend our partnership and conduct a global survey.”

More on the Lenovo Website: Research Brief | Topline Findings | Full News Release

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A Critical Opportunity for US Semiconductor Competitiveness

Jeff Rittener
Jeff Rittener
Chief Government Affairs Officer
General Manager of Governments, Markets and Trade

By Jeff Rittener

In 2001, there were 130 leading-edge semiconductor companies — many in the U.S., providing hundreds of thousands of high-tech, high-wage jobs. However, the industry has shrunk due to the soaring complexity, cost and investment required to stay on the leading edge.

Today, only Intel, Samsung and TSMC are truly advancing semiconductor manufacturing technology. Among them, only Intel is a U.S. firm. According to the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), the U.S. now accounts for just 12% of global capacity, with more than 80% of semiconductor production taking place in Asia.

An important amendment added to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2021 shows that Congressional leaders understand and recognize that the foundation of U.S. technological leadership is in peril. This bicameral, bipartisan amendment would create important federal incentives to reverse the serious erosion of U.S. semiconductor manufacturing by authorizing a Commerce Department grant program to promote semiconductor manufacturing, and a Defense Department partnership program to encourage development of advanced and secure microelectronics. It would also increase federal semiconductor research and development (R&D).

More: Manufacturing at Intel

We at Intel are encouraged by the broad desire within the U.S. government to bolster the U.S. semiconductor industry and the thousands of suppliers, toolmakers and other companies that support it. This amendment is the right start, but policymakers will need to work to support and fund this program at levels necessary to ensure the growth of U.S. semiconductor manufacturing.

Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas; Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; Tom Cotton, R-Ark.; and Mark Warner, D-Va., as well as Reps. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., and Michael McCaul, R-Texas, are creating a path for the U.S. semiconductor industry to better compete with heavily subsidized foreign competitors.

Our 5G networks, smart grids, financial and healthcare systems, and even national defense systems, are all powered by semiconductors. In 2019, according to SIA, 932 billion semiconductors were sold worldwide. This is the basis and structure of our digital economy, our communication systems and, indeed, our very lives. All of it rests on a foundation of silicon.

There is no denying that competing in this global market is tough. Intel invests tens of billions of dollars annually in R&D and manufacturing in Arizona, California, Oregon and New Mexico. Renewed support and investment by the U.S. government in the semiconductor industry could have a significant impact that ensures American companies lead the next generation of innovative technology.

The capital costs associated with developing U.S.-based semiconductor operations are nearly unmatched among other manufacturing operations. A modern semiconductor manufacturing plant requires an investment upwards of $10 billion compared with approximately $2 billion in 2001. According to a McKinsey study, this cost rises 13% annually with each generation’s added technological complexity. In addition, it costs about 25% more to build and operate a modern semiconductor manufacturing facility in the U.S. versus overseas. Despite the cost differential, Intel has maintained most of its advanced manufacturing and R&D in the U.S.

U.S. semiconductor manufacturing leadership begins with extensive R&D. Intel and other U.S.-based semiconductor companies incur most of their R&D expenses within the U.S. Ensuring that U.S. semiconductor R&D related to manufacturing stays in the U.S. should be an important consideration as the authorization and appropriations debate continue.

The grant program authorized in the House and Senate through the NDAA originally included meaningful funding levels. Specific funding levels need be restored to its original intent and complemented by the investment tax credit that was originally included in the CHIPS for America Act (H.R. 7178/S.3933).

The U.S. semiconductor industry is a strategic hub of innovation that we can’t afford to concede to other nations. Both measures are needed to level the playing field and restore U.S. semiconductor leadership.

Jeff Rittener is the chief government affairs officer for Intel Corporation.

Photo Caption: An Intel employee moves withing the production and cleanroom facilities in Intel’s D1D/D1X plant in Hillsboro, Oregon. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

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Intel, MIT and Georgia Tech Deliver Improved Machine-Programming Code Similarity System

What’s New: Today, Intel unveiled a new machine programming (MP) system – in conjunction with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). The system, machine inferred code similarity (MISIM), is an automated engine designed to learn what a piece of software intends to do by studying the structure of the code and analyzing syntactic differences of other code with similar behavior.

“Intel’s ultimate goal for machine programming is to democratize the creation of software. When fully realized, MP will enable everyone to create software by expressing their intention in whatever fashion that’s best for them, whether that’s code, natural language or something else. That’s an audacious goal, and while there’s much more work to be done, MISIM is a solid step toward it.”
– Justin Gottschlich, principal scientist and director/founder of Machine Programming Research at Intel

Why It Matters: With the rise of heterogeneous computing, hardware and software systems are becoming increasingly complex. This complexity, paired with a shortage of programmers who can code at an expert level across multiple architectures, spotlights a need for new development approaches. Machine programming, a term coined by Intel Labs and MIT in their “Three Pillars of Machine Programming” paper, aims to improve development productivity through the use of automated tools. A key technology to several of these emerging machine programming tools is code similarity, which has the potential to accurately and efficiently automate some of the software development process to meet this need.

misim splashYet building accurate code similarity systems is a relatively unsolved problem. These systems attempt to determine whether two code snippets show similar characteristics or aim to achieve similar goals —  a daunting task when having only source code to learn from. MISIM can accurately determine when two pieces of code perform a similar computation, even when those pieces use different data structures and algorithms. “This is an important step toward the grander vision of machine programming,” Gottschlich said.

How It Works: A core differentiation between MISIM and existing code-similarity systems lies in its novel context-aware semantic structure (CASS), which aims to lift out what the code actually does. Unlike other existing approaches, CASS can be configured to a specific context, allowing it to capture information that describes the code at a higher level. CASS can provide more specific insight into what the code does rather than how it does it. Moreover, MISIM can do all of this without using a compiler, which translates human-readable source code into computer-executable machine code. This has many benefits over existing systems, including the ability to execute on incomplete snippets of code that a developer may be currently writing – an important practical characteristic for recommendation systems or automated bug fixing.

Once the code’s structure is integrated into CASS, neural network systems give similarity scores to pieces of code based on the jobs they are designed to carry out. In other words, if two pieces of code look very different in their structure but perform the same function, the neural networks would rate them as largely similar.

By bringing together these principles in a unified system, researchers found that MISIM was able to identify similar pieces of code up to 40x more accurately than prior state-of-the-art systems.

What’s Next: While Intel is still expanding the feature set of MISIM, the company has moved it from a research effort to a demonstration effort, with the goal of creating a code recommendation engine to assist all software developers programming across Intel’s various heterogeneous architectures. This type of system would be able to recognize the intent behind a simple algorithm input by a developer and offer candidate codes that are semantically similar but with improved performance.

Intel’s Machine Programming Lab is also engaging with software groups at Intel to see how MISIM can be integrated into their day-to-day development. Gottschlich, who is also an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, hopes to help them, and Intel at large, to improve productivity and eliminate some of the mundane parts of programming, like hunting down bugs. Gottschlich speculates, “I imagine most developers would happily let the machine find and fix bugs for them, if it could – I know I would.”

More Context: MISM: An End-to-End Neural Code Similarity System | Why More Software Development Needs to Go to the Machines | Intel Labs (Press Kit) | Three Pillars of Machine Programming

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Intel Makes Changes to Technology Organization

SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 27, 2020 – Today, Intel CEO Bob Swan announced changes to the company’s technology organization and executive team to accelerate product leadership and improve focus and accountability in process technology execution. Effective immediately, the Technology, Systems Architecture and Client Group (TSCG) will be separated into the following teams, whose leaders will report directly to the CEO:

  • Technology Development, led by Dr. Ann Kelleher. An accomplished Intel leader, Kelleher has been head of Intel manufacturing, where she ensured continuous operations through the COVID-19 pandemic while increasing supply capacity to meet customer needs and accelerating the ramp of Intel’s 10nm process. She will now lead Intel technology development focusing on 7nm and 5nm processes. Dr. Mike Mayberry, who has been leading Technology Development, will consult and assist in the transition until his planned retirement at the end of the year. Mayberry has a 36-year track record of innovation at Intel, during which he has made key contributions in technology development and as the leader of Intel Labs.
  • Manufacturing and Operations, led by Keyvan Esfarjani. Esfarjani most recently led manufacturing for Intel’s Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group (NSG), in which role he set the vision and strategy for Intel’s memory manufacturing and led a rapid expansion of capacity. He will now lead global manufacturing operations and continue Kelleher’s work driving product ramp and the build-out of new fab capacity.
  • Design Engineering, led in the interim by Josh Walden while Intel conducts an accelerated global search to identify a permanent world-class leader. Walden is a proven leader in technology manufacturing and platform engineering. Most recently, he has been leading the Intel Product Assurance and Security Group (IPAS), which will continue to report to him.
  • Architecture, Software and Graphics will continue to be led by Raja Koduri. Koduri has responsibility for driving the development of Intel’s architecture and software strategy, and dedicated graphics product portfolio. Under his leadership, we will continue to invest in our software capability as a strategic asset and further build-out software engineering with cloud, platform, solutions and services expertise.
  • Supply Chain will continue to be led by Dr. Randhir Thakur.  Thakur will report directly to the CEO as chief supply chain officer, recognizing the ever-growing importance of this role and our relationships with key players in the ecosystem. Thakur and his team are charged with ensuring supply chain is a competitive advantage for Intel.

As a result of these changes, Murthy Renduchintala will leave Intel on Aug. 3, 2020.

“I look forward to working directly with these talented and experienced technology leaders, each of whom is committed to driving Intel forward during this period of critical execution,” said Swan. “I also want to thank Murthy for his leadership in helping Intel transform our technology platform. We have the most diverse portfolio of leadership products in our history and, as a result of our six pillars of innovation and disaggregation strategy, much more flexibility in how we build, package and deliver those products for our customers.”

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Intel RealSense Technology Selected by RightHand Robotics to Revolutionize Automated Order Fulfillment

Intel RealSense 1

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Due to the global pandemic, this year’s e-commerce sales are on the rise. Growth in online retail has placed increased pressure on warehouses to keep up with higher volumes of orders and with social-distancing protocols that have restricted the number of staff allowed on-site. Massachusetts-based RightHand Robotics addresses these challenges with its RightPick2 robot, powered by the Intel® RealSense™ D415 Depth Camera. The RightPick2 is an autonomous robotic piece-picking solution and labor multiplier that allows for rapid order fulfillment with little to no human contact.

More: Intel Real Sense (Press Kit)

The Intel RealSense D415 provides each RightHand robot with the ability to discern objects and their locations in a bin, while avoiding collisions when pulling them out. The camera also provides the data that helps RightHand Robotics improve its platform over time. Depth images from the Intel RealSense D415 gathered over millions of individual picks help RightHand learn the best way for the robot to approach different shapes and classes of items.

Aided by the RightPick2 robot, a single warehouse worker now has the ability to manage a fleet of robots, picking and placing thousands of SKUs instead of having to search warehouse aisles. This results in each robot significantly reducing lead times by fulfilling orders accurately at high speeds, and ultimately enables businesses to give customers what they need.

The RightHand Robotics solution is targeted to make warehouses safer for employees amid the pandemic and help facilities reopen while adhering to distancing guidelines. With more warehouses rapidly adopting the digital warehouse model, robotic process automation fueled by Intel RealSense technology provides a way to more efficiently fulfill the growing demand.

Customer Stories: Intel Customer Spotlight on Intel.com | Customer Stories on Intel Newsroom

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