Intel Study: Applying Emerging Technology to Solve Environmental Challenges

todd bradyBy Todd Brady

Technology and environmental sustainability leaders must work together on collaborative solutions to unlock the power of emerging technology to address the challenges of environmental sustainability, including those related to climate change and responsible water management.

These aren’t small or simple tasks. For example, with droughts resulting in billions of dollars’ worth of damage, access to clean water is an important global issue.

To better understand how emerging technologies can be applied today and in the future, Intel and the research firm Concentrix recently conducted a study of more than 200 business decision-makers working in environmental sustainability. The study revealed that the majority are optimistic about the power of these technologies: 74 percent of respondents agree that artificial intelligence (AI) will help solve long-standing environmental challenges; 64 percent agree that the internet of things (IoT) will help solve these challenges.

Despite the promise technology holds, the survey also reveals barriers preventing broader adoption of these solutions for sustainability. Respondents cite cost as the top challenge for implementation at 33 percent, followed by regulatory approval at 17 percent. Additionally, just under half of respondents in the survey say they don’t know about or aren’t using emerging tech to support their water conservation strategies.

At GreenBiz’s Verge Conference: Where Technology Meets Sustainability, we convened a workshop with sustainability and technology leaders from a variety of organizations spanning academia, the Fortune 500, private-sector companies and environmental nonprofits to examine these survey findings and discuss solutions to perceived barriers. Ideas included:

  • Realizing that cost is not a barrier, but rather one of the fundamental reasons to adopt emerging technology solutions as they have the potential for long-term savings.
  • Creating shared supply chain goals and standards while also collaborating with customers to create greater environmental impact.
  • Sharing learnings from past mistakes through ongoing collaboration to build new systems that are more resilient and efficient.

To accelerate solutions’ deployment and realize their full potential, public and private organizations need to reduce the barriers to implementation and bridge the awareness gaps regarding cost-effective solutions that already exist today. In doing so, we’ll unlock greater access to environmental data for decision-making and new insights into our collective impact on the environment.

As a leader in emerging technologies – from AI to IoT to 5G communications – Intel is uniquely suited to build the foundation that will enable innovations across the environmental sustainability field. For the last few years, we’ve been working with partners to develop solutions to address many environmental challenges, such as smart city IoT technologydigital solutions that use natural resources more efficiently, and smart, green buildings.

Last year, we announced our commitment to restoring 100 percent of our global water use by 2025. One year in, we have funded 14 water projects across California, Arizona, New Mexico and Oregon, that, once complete, are expected to achieve approximately 56 percent of our goal. For example, in central Arizona, we have been working with a local farmer to pilot IoT sensors to monitor soil moisture and local weather conditions, aimed at reducing water usage.

In Costa Rica, Intel is using drones to re-create 3D models of forests’ surfaces, gathering information about tree health, height, biomass and other factors to estimate the amount of carbon they store. The result is an innovative interpretation of highly precise information about carbon capture and its implications for scientific research, management, conservation, monitoring and other uses.

As a society, we continue to face enormous environmental challenges. However, the actions we take today can arm us with the tools to adapt to our changing world, preserving our natural resources and quality of life for future generations.

And here at Intel, we will continue to encourage collaboration across organizations. It’s the only way to drive true transformation and create positive change for the environment.

To see full details of our progress to date, read Intel’s most recent Corporate Responsibility Report.

Todd Brady is director of Global Public Affairs and Sustainability at Intel Corporation.

Photo caption: Internet of things sensors at a hazelnut orchard in Oregon monitor moisture and reduce water use. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

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Images: New Intel Architectures and Technologies Target Expanded Market Opportunities

Intel Architecture Day 7

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Photo 1: People attending Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, experience demos showing Intel’s latest technology and architecture innovations. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 2: People attending Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, experience demos showing Intel’s latest technology and architecture innovations. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 3: At the Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, Jim Keller, Intel senior vice president and general manager of the Silicon Engineer Group, explains how the company is positioned to deliver leadership products across architectures and workloads for an expanding data-centric market. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 4: At the Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, Jim Keller, Intel senior vice president and general manager of the Silicon Engineer Group, explains how the company is positioned to deliver leadership products across architectures and workloads for an expanding data-centric market. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 5: At Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, Raja Koduri, Intel chief architect, senior vice president of Core and Visual Computing Group and general manager of Edge Computing Solutions, explains how the company is positioned to deliver leadership products across architectures and workloads for an expanding data-centric market. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 6: At Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, Raja Koduri, Intel chief architect, senior vice president of Core and Visual Computing Group and general manager of Edge Computing Solutions, explains how the company is positioned to deliver leadership products across architectures and workloads for an expanding data-centric market. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 7: At Intel Architecture Day on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, Raja Koduri, Intel chief architect, senior vice president of Core and Visual Computing Group and general manager of Edge Computing Solutions, explains how the company is positioned to deliver leadership products across architectures and workloads for an expanding data-centric market. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

More: New Intel Architectures and Technologies Target Expanded Market Opportunities

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New Intel Architectures and Technologies Target Expanded Market Opportunities

Intel Architecture Day 7

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At Intel’s recent Architecture Day, Raja Koduri, Intel’s senior vice president of Core and Visual Computing, outlined a strategic shift for the company’s design and engineering model. This shift combines a series of foundational building blocks that leverage a world-class portfolio of technologies and intellectual property (IP) within the company.

Architecture Day Fact Sheet: New Intel Architectures and Technologies Target Expanded Market Opportunities

This approach is designed to allow Intel to drive an accelerated pace of innovation and leadership, and will be anchored across six strategic pillars:

2d and 3d packaging drive new design flexibility
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Process: Access to leadership process technology remains essential to building leadership products. Advanced packaging solutions will enable Intel to continue exponential scaling in computing density by extending transistor density to the third dimension.

Architecture: The future is a diverse mix of scalar, vector, matrix and spatial architectures deployed in CPU, GPU, accelerator and FPGA sockets, enabled by a scalable software stack, integrated into systems by advanced packaging technology.

Memory: High-capacity, high-speed storage is crucial for next-generation computing workloads. Intel is uniquely positioned to combine in-package memory and Intel® Optane™ technology to fill gaps in the memory hierarchy to provide bandwidth closer to the silicon die.

Interconnect: Communication scales from wireless connections for 5G infrastructure to silicon-level package and die interconnects. Only by offering a complete range of leading interconnect products enables the heterogeneous computing landscape at scale.

Security: With the emergence of new threats, Intel has all the components to build a “better together” security strategy. Intel is uniquely positioned to deliver security technologies that help improve the end-to-end and to make security advancements a key differentiator.

Software: For every order of magnitude performance potential of a new hardware architecture there are two orders of magnitude performance enabled by software. A common set of tools that can address Intel silicon for developers is critical to exponential scaling.

Q&A – RAJA KODURI

Why do you believe that in this new era of computing Intel should anchor its product and technology strategy around these six pillars?

The landscape for computing has evolved dramatically over the past decade. We operate in a world where we generate data at a faster rate than our ability to analyze, understand and help secure it. We see immense demand for computing architectures that evolve rapidly and scale exponentially. We have a bold engineering vision over the next five years to deliver 10 petaflops of compute and 10 petabytes of data within 10 milliseconds to every person in the world. We believe these six technology pillars are the key enablers for us to drive the needed product innovation to achieve this.

How do the IP and resources in the six pillars best position Intel to win and deliver differentiated products from your competitors?

When I joined Intel, I was amazed at the sheer volume and breadth of IP available to us. In nearly three decades in the industry, I’ve never seen anything like it. The scale of these resources gives us a differentiated set of technologies in each of these pillars to apply as we drive wave after wave of innovation for client, edge and cloud computing environments. I believe we are uniquely positioned to deliver leadership across all six of these pillars which provides a foundation for sustained innovation nobody else can offer.

3d packaging a catalyst for product innovation
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Why did the innovation model have to change? 

The world has changed and so has our business; we’ve moved to target an addressable market north of $300 billion1. The rising demand for computing provides us with a chance to change, mold and expand Intel in an unprecedented manner. We have a responsibility not only to ourselves, but also to our customers who trust us with their businesses, critical data and computing needs, to reinvent our products and strategy for developing technologies for the next decade and beyond.

How is Intel applying the model today and in the future? 

We’re applying the model today across our engineering organization as we bring innovative new product and technology initiatives to the world next year and into the future. Whether it’s the advanced packaging innovation through “Foveros” logic stacking or the “One API” approach to software developers, we’re taking steps to drive sustainable new waves of innovation.

How does the shifting landscape in computing workloads impact how Intel will build its next-generation products?

The workloads associated with this computing landscape are changing. No longer do consumers or enterprise customers have simple applications that can be addressed with straightforward scalar architectures alone. Instead we see programs that are solving problems faster by integrating additional architectures from graphics processors to artificial intelligence accelerators to image processors and even adaptable designs like FPGAs powered by new memory technologies. We will combine computing and architecture innovations through high-speed interconnects with new models for software development that simplify APIs for developers and allow more performance and efficiency to be unlocked from Intel computing architectures.

How do Intel’s investments in the six pillars drive Moore’s Law-like leaps forward in user experience?

In the previous generations, the answer has been that transistor density and Moore’s Law will play the lead role to solve computing problems. But as the process node transitions have slowed from the pace of the previous decades, it is the essence of Moore’s Law that continues to provide new technologies and capabilities to meet the demands of modern computing. The message of Moore’s Law is about more than transistors alone, with the combination of transistors, architectural research, connectivity advancements, faster memory systems, and software working together to drive it forward.

1Intel calculated 2022 total addressable market opportunity derived from industry analyst reports and internal estimates.

Forward-Looking Statements

Statements in this discussion that refer to future plans and expectations, including with respect to Intel’s future technologies and the expected benefits of such technologies, are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Words such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “goals,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” and variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. Statements that refer to or are based on estimates, forecasts, projections, uncertain events or assumptions, including statements relating to total addressable market (TAM) or market opportunity and anticipated trends in our businesses or the markets relevant to them, also identify forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on current expectations and involve many risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in these forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the company’s expectations are set forth in Intel’s most recent earnings release dated October 25, 2018, which is included as an exhibit to Intel’s Form 8-K furnished to the SEC on such date. Additional information regarding these and other factors that could affect Intel’s results is included in Intel’s SEC filings, including the company’s most recent reports on Forms 10-K and 10-Q. Copies of Intel’s Form 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K reports may be obtained by visiting our Investor Relations website at www.intc.com or the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

 

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Fact Sheet: New Intel Architectures and Technologies Target Expanded Market Opportunities

Intel Architecture Day 7

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SANTA CLARA, Calif., Dec. 12, 2018 – At Intel “Architecture Day,” top executives, architects and fellows revealed next-generation technologies and discussed progress on a strategy to power an expanding universe of data-intensive workloads for PCs and other smart consumer devices, high-speed networks, ubiquitous artificial intelligence (AI), specialized cloud data centers and autonomous vehicles.

Intel demonstrated a range of 10nm-based systems in development for PCs, data centers and networking, and previewed other technologies targeted at an expanded range of workloads.

More: New Intel Architectures and Technologies Target Expanded Market Opportunities

2d and 3d packaging drive new design flexibility
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The company also shared its technical strategy focused on six engineering segments where significant investments and innovation are being pursued to drive leaps forward in technology and user experience. They include: advanced manufacturing processes and packaging; new architectures to speed-up specialized tasks like AI and graphics; super-fast memory; interconnects; embedded security features; and common software to unify and simplify programming for developers across Intel’s compute roadmap.

Together these technologies lay the foundation for a more diverse era of computing in an expanded addressable market opportunity of more than $300 billion by 2022.1

Intel Architecture Day Highlights:

  • Industry-First 3D Stacking of Logic Chips: Intel demonstrated a new 3D packaging technology, called “Foveros,” which for the first time brings the benefits of 3D stacking to enable logic-on-logic integration.
     
    Foveros paves the way for devices and systems combining high-performance, high-density and low-power silicon process technologies. Foveros is expected to extend die stacking beyond traditional passive interposers and stacked memory to high-performance logic, such as CPU, graphics and AI processors for the first time.
     
    The technology provides tremendous flexibility as designers seek to “mix and match” technology IP blocks with various memory and I/O elements in new device form factors. It will allow products to be broken up into smaller “chiplets,” where I/O, SRAM and power delivery circuits can be fabricated in a base die and high-performance logic chiplets are stacked on top.
     
    Intel expects to launch a range of products using Foveros beginning in the second half of 2019. The first Foveros product will combine a high-performance 10nm compute-stacked chiplet with a low-power 22FFL base die. It will enable the combination of world-class performance and power efficiency in a small form factor.
     
    Foveros is the next leap forward following Intel’s breakthrough Embedded Multi-die Interconnect Bridge (EMIB) 2D packaging technology, introduced in 2018.
     
  • New Sunny Cove CPU Architecture: Intel introduced Sunny Cove, Intel’s next-generation CPU microarchitecture designed to increase performance per clock and power efficiency for general purpose computing tasks, and includes new features to accelerate special purpose computing tasks like AI and cryptography. Sunny Cove will be the basis for Intel’s next-generation server (Intel® Xeon®) and client (Intel® Core™) processors later next year. Sunny Cove features include:
     
    • Enhanced microarchitecture to execute more operations in parallel.
    • New algorithms to reduce latency.
    • Increased size of key buffers and caches to optimize data-centric workloads.
    • Architectural extensions for specific use cases and algorithms. For example, new performance-boosting instructions for cryptography, such as vector AES and SHA-NI, and other critical use cases like compression and decompression.

     
    Sunny Cove enables reduced latency and high throughput, as well as offers much greater parallelism that is expected to improve experiences from gaming to media to data-centric applications.

  • Next-Generation Graphics: Intel unveiled new Gen11 integrated graphics with 64 enhanced execution units, more than double previous Intel Gen9 graphics (24 EUs), designed to break the 1 TFLOPS barrier. The new integrated graphics will be delivered in 10nm-based processors beginning in 2019.
     
    The new integrated graphics architecture is expected to double the computing performance-per-clock compared to Intel Gen9 graphics. With >1 TFLOPS performance capability, this architecture is designed to increase game playability. At the event, Intel showed Gen11 graphics nearly doubling the performance of a popular photo recognition application when compared to Intel’s Gen9 graphics. Gen11 graphics is expected to also feature an advanced media encoder and decoder, supporting 4K video streams and 8K content creation in constrained power envelopes. Gen11 will also feature Intel® Adaptive Sync technology enabling smooth frame rates for gaming.
     
    Intel also reaffirmed its plan to introduce a discrete graphics processor by 2020.
  • “One API” Software: Intel announced the “One API” project to simplify the programming of diverse computing engines across CPU, GPU, FPGA, AI and other accelerators. The project includes a comprehensive and unified portfolio of developer tools for mapping software to the hardware that can best accelerate the code. A public project release is expected to be available in 2019.
  • Memory and Storage: Intel discussed updates on Intel® Optane™ technology and the products based upon that technology. Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory is a new product that converges memory-like performance with the data persistence and large capacity of storage. The revolutionary technology brings more data closer to the CPU for faster processing of bigger data sets like those used in AI and large databases. Its large capacity and data persistence reduces the need to make time-consuming trips to storage, which can improve workload performance. Intel Optane DC persistent memory delivers cache line (64B) reads to the CPU. On average, the average idle read latency with Optane persistent memory is expected to be about 350 nanoseconds when applications direct the read operation to Optane persistent memory, or when the requested data is not cached in DRAM. For scale, an Optane DC SSD has an average idle read latency of about 10,000 nanoseconds (10 microseconds), a remarkable improvement.2 In cases where requested data is in DRAM, either cached by the CPU’s memory controller or directed by the application, memory sub-system responsiveness is expected to be identical to DRAM (<100 nanoseconds).

3d packaging a catalyst for product innovation
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The company also showed how SSDs based on Intel’s 1 Terabit QLC NAND die move more bulk data from HDDs to SSDs, allowing faster access to that data.
 
The combination of Intel Optane SSDs with QLC NAND SSDs will enable lower latency access to data used most frequently. Taken together, these platform and memory advances complete the memory and storage hierarchy providing the right set of choices for systems and applications.

  • Deep Learning Reference Stack: Intel is releasing the Deep Learning Reference Stack, an integrated, highly-performant open source stack optimized for Intel® Xeon® Scalable platforms. This open source community release is part of our effort to ensure AI developers have easy access to all of the features and functionality of the Intel platforms. The Deep Learning Reference Stack is highly-tuned and built for cloud native environments. With this release, Intel is enabling developers to quickly prototype by reducing the complexity associated with integrating multiple software components, while still giving users the flexibility to customize their solutions.
    • Operating System: Clear Linux* OS is customizable to individual development needs, tuned for Intel platforms and specific use cases like deep learning;
    • Orchestration: Kubernetes* manages and orchestrates containerized applications for multi-node clusters with Intel platform awareness;
    • Containers: Docker* containers and Kata* containers utilize Intel® Virtualization Technology to help secure container;
    • Libraries: Intel® Math Kernel Library for Deep Neural Networks (MKL DNN) is Intel’s highly optimized math library for mathematical function performance;
    • Runtimes: Python* providing application and service execution runtime support is highly tuned and optimized for Intel architecture;
    • Frameworks: TensorFlow* is a leading deep learning and machine learning framework;
    • Deployment: KubeFlow* is an open-source industry-driven deployment tool that provides a fast experience on Intel architecture, ease of installation and simple use.

1Intel calculated 2022 total addressable market opportunity derived from industry analyst reports and internal estimates.

2Average idle read latency is the mean time for read data to return to a requesting processor. This is an average; some latencies will be longer. Tests document performance of components on a particular test, in specific systems. Differences in hardware, software or configuration will affect actual performance. Consult other sources of information to evaluate performance as you consider your purchase. For more complete information about performance and benchmark results, visit www.intel.com/benchmarks.

Forward-Looking Statements

Statements in this news summary that refer to future plans and expectations, including with respect to Intel’s future products and the expected availability and benefits of such products, are forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Words such as “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “goals,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “could,” and variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. Statements that refer to or are based on estimates, forecasts, projections, uncertain events or assumptions, including statements relating to total addressable market (TAM) or market opportunity and anticipated trends in our businesses or the markets relevant to them, also identify forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on the company’s current expectations and involve many risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in these forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the company’s expectations are set forth in Intel’s earnings release dated October 25, 2018, which is included as an exhibit to Intel’s Form 8-K furnished to the SEC on such date. Additional information regarding these and other factors that could affect Intel’s results is included in Intel’s SEC filings, including the company’s most recent reports on Forms 10-K and 10-Q. Copies of Intel’s Form 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K reports may be obtained by visiting our Investor Relations website at www.intc.com or the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

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2019 CES

Intel technology is the foundation for the world’s most important innovations and advances.

At CES 2019, we will share our vision for the future of computing and explore advancements in the client, network, cloud and edge — designed to power the next era of computing in areas including PC innovation, artificial intelligence, 5G connectivity and autonomous driving.

Others predict the future. We’re building it.

ALL CES NEWS

MEDIA RESOURCES

Intel at 2018 CES

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Media Alert: Intel to Showcase Technology Innovation for the Next Era of Computing at CES 2019

gbryant nshenoy 2x1
Gregory Bryant (left) and Navin Shenoy will lead Intel’s news conference at 4 p.m. Jan. 7, 2019, at 2019 CES.

Intel technology is the foundation for many of the world’s most important innovations and advances. At CES 2019, Intel will highlight the future of computing and explore advancements in the client, network, cloud and edge designed to unlock human potential.

Intel News Conference – “Innovations and the Compute Foundation”

Join Intel executives, Client Computing Group Senior Vice President Gregory Bryant and Data Center Group Executive Vice President Navin Shenoy, who will take the stage to showcase news related to innovations in client computing, data center, artificial intelligence, 5G and more. During the event, Intel will touch on how expanding technology capabilities have a direct impact on human experiences. Please note, there is limited seating. Doors open to press and analysts at 3:30 p.m. PST.

Where: Mandalay Bay South Convention Center
Level 2, Ballrooms E & F
When: Jan. 7, 4-4:45 p.m. PST
Livestream:    Watch on the Intel Newsroom

Intel Press Breakfast & Booth Preview

Mix and mingle with Intel executives and take part in a guided tour of Intel’s booth to see the latest Intel technology in action – before the CES show floor opens to attendees. The CES opening keynote will be livestreamed at 8:30 a.m., and a light continental breakfast will be served. Please note, only credentialed press will be allowed access, and registration is requested at the link below.

Where:    Las Vegas Convention Center
Intel Booth in Central Hall South (Booth #10048)
When: Jan. 8, 7:30-9:30 a.m. PST

 

» Register for the Press Breakfast

Mobileye Press & Customer Conference – “An Hour with Amnon”

Join Mobileye CEO Amnon Shashua as he delivers a “state of the state” on automated driving technologies, along with a look at how these technologies are being delivered globally. Shashua will touch on Mobileye’s unique perspective on vision and mapping technologies, along with the company’s proposed model for industry-wide safety standards.

Where:    Las Vegas Convention Center Room S228
When: Jan. 8, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. PST

 

Visit Intel in the Central Hall South (Booth #10048)

Stop by our booth for an up-close look at how Intel’s technology is helping power the smart, connected data-centric world and how it is helping accelerate the expansion of human potential.

Where:    Las Vegas Convention Center
Central Hall South, C2 lobby entrance
When: Jan. 8, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. PST
Jan. 9 and Jan. 10, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. PST
Jan. 11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. PST

 

Throughout CES:

  • Recharge in Intel’s Media-Only Lounge: Intel’s media lounge is a great getaway for you to enjoy. Located upstairs in the Intel booth, stop by to relax in our comfortable seating, snack, quench your thirst and use our dedicated internet access.
  • Spotlight Sessions: Throughout the week, Intel will host Spotlight Sessions at the Intel booth. They will focus on specific topics including 5G, autonomous driving, artificial intelligence and more. Final schedule will be uploaded to the CES press kit on the Intel Newsroom prior to the show.
  • Booth Demonstrations: Experience Intel technology and products.

Can’t Make It to CES 2019?

Visit our newsroom at newsroom.intel.com/2019-CES and follow us on social media at @IntelNews, @Intel and www.facebook.com/intel.

Media Contacts

Laurie Smith DeJong
(503) 313-6891
laurie.smith.dejong@intel.com

Erica Pereira Kubr
(415) 471-4970
erica.pereira.kubr@intel.com

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Images: 50th Anniversary Goal Achieved: Record Number of Intel Employee Volunteers Give Back across the Globe

50th urban garden

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Photo 1: Intel volunteers build an urban garden at the Colmena Miramar Community Center in Jalisco, Mexico. Intel announced on Dec. 11, 2018, that it exceeded its 50th anniversary volunteer goal with more than 63,000 employees – nearly 60 percent of its total employee population – giving more than 1 million hours of their time. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 2: Intel volunteers perform a variety of tasks to support Reaching Out, one of the largest emergency food pantries in San Jose, Calif. Intel announced on Dec. 11, 2018, that it exceeded its 50th anniversary volunteer goal with more than 63,000 employees – nearly 60 percent of its total employee population – giving more than 1 million hours of their time. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 3: Twenty-one Intel senior leaders volunteered at the Second Harvest Food Bank in San Jose, Calif. Front row (from left): Paula Tolliver, Ian Yang, Leslie Culbertson, Sandra Rivera, Navin Shenoy (kneeling), Josh Walden, Bob Swan, Michelle Johnston Holthaus, Naveen Rao. Back row (from left): Raja Koduri, Matt Smith, Steve Rodgers, Dan McNamara, Jim Keller, Rob Crooke, Tom Lantzsch, Gregory Bryant, Murthy Renduchintala, Mike Mayberry, Allon Stabinsky, and Cormac Conroy. Intel announced on Dec. 11, 2018, that it exceeded its 50th anniversary volunteer goal with more than 63,000 employees – nearly 60 percent of its total employee population – giving more than 1 million hours of their time. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 4: Intel employees help remove invasive species at the Yunqiao Wetlands in Chengdu, China. Intel announced on Dec. 11, 2018, that it exceeded its 50th anniversary volunteer goal with more than 63,000 employees – nearly 60 percent of its total employee population – giving more than 1 million hours of their time. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 5: Intel employees volunteer as buddies to young adults at the Bubbles Center for Autism in Bengaluru, India. Intel announced on Dec. 11, 2018, that it exceeded its 50th anniversary volunteer goal with more than 63,000 employees – nearly 60 percent of its total employee population – giving more than 1 million hours of their time. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

More: 50th Anniversary Goal Achieved: Record Number of Intel Employee Volunteers Give Back across the Globe

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50th Anniversary Goal Achieved: Record Number of Intel Employee Volunteers Give Back across the Globe

50th urban garden

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What’s New: In celebration of Intel’s 50th anniversary, the company set a goal for 50,000 employees to volunteer 1 million hours around the world in 2018. Intel announced today that it exceeded that goal with more than 63,000 employees – nearly 60 percent of its total employee population – giving more than 1 million hours of their time in 28 countries to date.

“Volunteering has been a part of Intel’s DNA for more than two decades. Engaging and mobilizing more than half of our employees to volunteer was no easy feat. Volunteer champions worked diligently with local nonprofits and schools to create meaningful volunteer experiences that ranged from long-term, skill-based volunteering in human resources, legal, finance and technology, to on-site volunteer events for our workers with limited time but a lot of heart. Managers embraced this cause, rallying their teams and role modeling volunteerism. I also want to recognize Global Public Affairs and the Intel Foundation for the tireless program management to make our 50th anniversary volunteer challenge one for the record books.”
–Ann Kelleher, Intel senior vice president, Manufacturing and Operations

Why It Matters: Intel Involved, Intel’s corporate volunteer program, began in 1995. Since then, employees have generously volunteered with causes such as education, community development and tackling environmental challenges. Over the past decade, Intel employees have volunteered more than 10 million hours globally.

This year resulted in more volunteers in a single year than ever before, a 59 percent increase compared with 2017. Volunteers gave back at a wide range of nonprofit organizations, including more than 210,000 hours to schools and educational institutions, nearly 110,000 hours to human services, and more than 41,000 hours to youth development programs. The numbers will continue to grow as employees give back through the remainder of the year.

There’s More: Through the Intel Involved Matching Grant Program, qualified schools and nonprofit organizations are eligible for Volunteer Matching Grants from the Intel Foundation for every hour volunteered. Intel expects this will result in nearly $12 million to over 4,000 schools and charitable organizations around the world.

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Intel Announces Neuromorphic Computing Research Collaborators

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Kapoho Bay is Intel’s codename for a a USB form factor based on the Loihi neuromorphic research chip system. Kapoho Bay provides a USB interface to Loihi, allowing access with peripherals. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)
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What’s New: Today, Intel named academic, government and corporate research groups participating in its Intel Neuromorphic Research Community (INRC) and discussed research progress from the inaugural INRC symposium held in October. The goal of the INRC is to tackle the challenges facing the adoption of neuromorphic architectures for mainstream computing applications. INRC members will use Intel’s Loihi research chip as the architectural focal point for research and development. Intel hopes the findings of this community will drive future improvement of neuromorphic architectures, software and systems, eventually leading to the commercialization of this promising technology.

“While there are many important unsolved neuromorphic computing research problems to explore at all levels of the computing stack, we believe the state of neuromorphic hardware currently leads the state of neuromorphic computing software. We’re confident this network of INRC members will rapidly advance the state of neuromorphic learning algorithms and demonstrate the value of this emerging technology for a wide range of applications.”
–Mike Davies, director of the Neuromorphic Computing Lab, Intel

Who is Participating: Fifty projects have been selected to participate in the INRC. Engaged INRC members will receive access to Intel’s Loihi neuromorphic research chip and software, and are invited to participate in technical symposiums where progress, results and insights will be shared among the community. INRC-supported workshops will offer members an opportunity to learn to develop for Loihi in extended hands-on tutorial sessions and hackathons hosted by Intel Labs researchers and collaborators.

Among the 50 selected projects, teams from 13 universities were selected to receive funding to pursue their research plans. These teams come from a wide range of academic institutions around the world, including University of Bern; University of California, Berkeley; University of California, San Diego; Cornell University; University of Göttingen; TU Graz; Harvard University; TU Munich; Radboud University; University of Tennessee; and Villanova University.

Projects have been scheduled to start over a series of four waves, the first of which began in 2018’s third quarter.

Results So Far: In October, Intel held an inaugural gathering of INRC members in Reykjavik, Iceland. More than 60 researchers attended over five days to discuss research plans, learn about Loihi and meet members of the community. Several presentations from early INRC members announced exciting preliminary progress:

  • Chris Eliasmith of Applied Brain Research Inc. (ABR)* shared early benchmarking results evaluating Loihi’s performance running an audio keyword spotting deep network implemented with ABR’s Nengo DL, which runs TensorFlow-trained networks on Loihi. These results show that for real-time streaming data inference applications, Loihi may provide better energy efficiency than conventional architectures by a factor of 2 times to over 50 times, depending on the architecture.
  • Professor Wolfgang Maass of the Institute for Theoretical Computer Science, Technische Universität Graz, discussed his team’s promising discovery of a new class of spiking neural nets that achieve classification accuracies similar to state-of-the-art deep learning models known as long short-term memory (LSTM) networks. LSTMs are commonly used today for speech recognition and natural language processing applications. These new spiking neural networks, named LSNNs, integrate working memory into their operation in a similar manner as LSTMs do, while promising significantly improved efficiency when running on neuromorphic hardware. This work, to be published at the Neural Information Processing Systems conference in December, was developed using a simulator. In collaboration with Intel Labs, Maass’ team is now working on mapping the networks to Loihi. The team shared early accuracy results from the Loihi network, which currently stand within a few percent of the ideal model.
  • Professor Thomas Cleland of Cornell University discussed a set of neuromorphic algorithms for signal restoration and identification in spiking neural networks based on computational principles inspired by the mammalian olfactory system. In work to be published in collaboration with Intel Labs, these algorithms running on Loihi have already shown state-of-the-art learning and classification performance on chemosensor data sets. “These algorithms were derived from mechanistic studies of the mammalian brain’s olfactory circuits, but I anticipate that in generalized form, they will be applicable to a range of similar computational problems such as air and water quality assessment, cancer screening, and genomic expression profiling,” Cleland said.

What Is Neuromorphic Computing: Neuromorphic computing entails nothing less than a bottom-up rethinking of computer architecture. By applying the latest insights from neuroscience, the goal is to create chips that function less like a classical computer and more like a human brain. Neuromorphic chips model how the brain’s neurons communicate and learn, using spikes and plastic synapses that can be modulated based on the timing of events. These chips are designed to self-organize and make decisions in response to learned patterns and associations.

The goal is that one day neuromorphic chips may be able to learn as fast and efficiently as the brain, which still far outperforms today’s most powerful computers. Neuromorphic computing could lead to big advancements in robotics, smart city infrastructure and other applications that require continuous learning and adaptation to evolving, real-world data.

Last year, Intel introduced the Loihi neuromorphic test chip, a first-of-its-kind research chip with an unprecedented combination of neuromorphic features, efficiency, scale and on-chip learning capabilities. Loihi serves as the architectural foundation for the INRC program. Intel provides INRC members with access to this leading neuromorphic chip to accelerate progress in this field of research.

What is Next: Intel has released early versions of its software development kit for Loihi, named Nx SDK, to engaged INRC members. Researchers may remotely log in to Intel’s neuromorphic cloud service to access Loihi hardware and Nx SDK to develop their algorithms, software and applications. Additionally, Intel has supported Applied Brain Research to port its Nengo software framework to work with Loihi. Nengo is freely available today for research use.

Loihi hardware has been made available to select INRC members for research in domains such as robotics that require direct access to hardware. These systems include a USB form factor code-named “Kapoho Bay.” In addition to providing a USB interface to Loihi, Kapoho Bay offers an event-driven hardware interface to the DAVIS 240C DVS silicon retina camera available from iniVation*, among other peripherals.

Next year, Intel and INRC members expect to contribute much of the enabling software and research results to the public domain in the form of publications and open source software. INRC membership is expected to steadily grow, and as the foundational algorithms and SDK components mature, Intel foresees an increasing project focus on real-world applications, ultimately leading to the commercialization of neuromorphic technology.

How to Get Involved: Neuroscientists, computational scientists and machine learning researchers interested in participating in the INRC and developing for Loihi are encouraged to email inrc_interest@intel.com for more information.

Additionally, Intel’s Neuromorphic Computing Lab will support full-day tutorials on Loihi’s systems and software at two upcoming events: at the 2019 Riken International Workshop on Neuromorphic Computing in Kobe, Japan, on March 13, and at the 2019 Neuro Inspired Computing Elements (NICE) Workshop in Albany, New York, on March 29. The tutorials will be open to all registered attendees of these workshops.

More Context: Intel Labs

The post Intel Announces Neuromorphic Computing Research Collaborators appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

New Intel Survey Finds People Are Excited about the Future 5G Enables Despite Knowledge Gap

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What’s New: Americans are excited about the future of 5G-enabled entertainment and are willing to pay more, but there is still much the industry needs to do to create anticipation and close the 5G knowledge gap, a new study from Intel says.

“Digital disruption is eroding the borders that once separated entertainment, media, technology and telecommunications companies. The next generation of media and entertainment growth is not just about what content companies create but how seamlessly customers can access it and the unique ways they can interact with it.”
–Jonathan Wood, general manager of Business Development & Partnerships, 5G Next Generation and Standards at Intel

What the Study Says: The latest chapter of Intel’s “5G Economics of Entertainment Report” finds that Americans are ready to open their pocketbooks for the enhanced experiences that 5G will bring to media and entertainment – good news for the operators eager to understand how to monetize their 5G investments.

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» Click for full infographic

However, it is not quite so cut and dried. Intel’s study shows that many people regard 5G as simply another “speed bump” and do not fully grasp the scale of change 5G has the potential to usher in.

This hypothesis was proven in a recent, but unrelated, Intel-sponsored consumer study that found 58 percent of Americans admit to not being knowledgeable or ever having heard of 5G. Recognizing the knowledge gap, Intel set out with this latest study to paint a picture of the type of new entertainment experiences 5G would enable and then asked people which they valued and their willingness to pay more.

Over half (54 percent) of Americans said they were willing to switch to 5G for all their connected home needs. And when asked to rank half a dozen future experiences 5G will enable, next-gen TV (54 percent), augmented instruction (41 percent) and immersive live events (40 percent) topped the wish list. (More: “People Are Excited about the Future 5G Enables Despite Knowledge Gap“)

When it comes to what people are willing to pay for 5G-enabled experiences, household income had no bearing, but there was a definite hunger for 5G among the younger cohort. A staggering 72 percent of Gen Zers (age 16-25) expressed their willingness to pay $20 per month more than for current 4G services. Forty percent of Americans would pay an additional $10 extra per month, and 27 percent would pay more than $20 per month.

Top drivers of enthusiasm for 5G include faster speed (64 percent), reliability (43 percent) and responsiveness (36 percent).

Why It’s Important: The 5G future will soon be here, and business models will be reinvented as companies tap into new revenue streams and attempt to create relevance with their audience at scale. In the golden era of television, having the best content in the world will cease to be enough if it gets snarled up in an inevitable communications traffic jam.

More Context:The consumer survey is part of the “5G Economics of Entertainment Report,” conducted by Ovum and sponsored by Intel, which measured the market and impact of 5G in media and entertainment. The report forecasts that over the next decade (2019-2028), media and entertainment companies will be competing to win a share of a near $3 trillion cumulative wireless revenue opportunity. Experiences enabled by 5G networks will account for nearly half of this revenue opportunity – close to $1.3 trillion.

And More Context: Visit “5G at Intel” to learn more about how Intel is helping drive the transformation of the network to modernize today’s communications infrastructure and build the foundation for 5G.

The post New Intel Survey Finds People Are Excited about the Future 5G Enables Despite Knowledge Gap appeared first on Intel Newsroom.