People, Processes, Products Define Intel’s Security Strategy

martin dixon
Martin G. Dixon
Intel fellow and Vice President, Intel Security Architecture and Engineering Group

By Martin G. Dixon

For more than 50 years, Intel has played a key role in shaping the future of computing and communications technologies that are the foundation of the world’s innovations. We strive to design, manufacture and sell the world’s most secure technology products. We also understand there is an intersection between innovation and security that requires a sense of trust.

Utilizing the breadth and scale of our reach is not something we take lightly. It takes commitment and a willingness to invest heavily in building systems that are resistant to emerging threats and to strategize for those that are not yet realized.

More: Security News at Intel

IDC expects worldwide security spending to reach $174.7 billion in 2024 with a compound annual growth rate of 8.1% over the 2020-2024 forecast period.1

Every year, even as the total investment in cybersecurity grows, vulnerabilities persist with an ever-increasing volume of threats to the confidentiality, integrity and availability of data.

Security doesn’t just happen. At Intel, our success relies on the success of our customers, and it starts with us. We have a clear long-term strategy, and it boils down to our people, our processes and our products.

People

I am proud that many of the world’s greatest security experts are at Intel. These trusted leaders are embedded across every product group, from architects and designers to technologists and researchers, and help ensure we all operate with a security-first mindset.

It is our people who build new security capabilitiesprotect against evolving threats and co-engineer security solutions with our partners. Our products are highly complex, and we cannot anticipate the myriad ways in which they will be used nor how sophisticated third parties will seek to undermine their integrity. We work with skilled security researchers across the globe to identify, test and validate the security of Intel products through our Bug Bounty Program and academic programs, including the Side Channel Academic Program.

Beyond what we do for Intel, we also work with the broader community and contribute to industry standardsdiscussions and think tanks to accelerate industry-level progress in security. Our success depends on executing the best possible products, and for that, we must have a culture where individuals are heard and the best idea wins.

As Nilofer Merchant wrote in the Harvard Business Review, “Culture Trumps Strategy, Every Time.” It is this culture that helps ensure that everything we build is designed to deliver the highest performance and optimal protections.

Processes

As we consider who we are and what’s changing in the world, we prioritize innovation, execution, culture and impact. We established the Intel Security Architecture and Engineering Group to lead this effort.

The entirety of a product’s life needs to be secure, and our development practices stem from a security development lifecycle (SDL). Intel SDL is a robust set of processes that integrates security principles and privacy tenets into every step of product development, from concept to support. We take a holistic approach to SDL, customizing the process to address the highly integrated nature of hardware, firmware and software development. This helps to ensure the delivery of a trustworthy product that can be effectively supported from beginning to end of life.

Building security and privacy into products from concept to retirement is not only a strong development practice, but it is also essential to enable customers to truly unleash the power of their data.

Once products are released, we continue to support them and address vulnerabilities. Our SDL process is closely connected to the Intel Product Security Incident Response Team and our internal research efforts that contribute to ongoing security assurance for products both in development and in the field. We feed the learnings of vulnerabilities directly into the concept and architecture stages of our products — constantly learning as threats evolve.

In 2020, 92% of vulnerabilities addressed in our products were a direct result of the proactive investment in our processes. It is our processes that allow us to address threats in a manner that is both comprehensive and maintains high performance, while adapting to new classes of vulnerabilities.

Products

Security is a system-level property rooted in the silicon. Every component in the system — from software to silicon — needs to do its part to help keep data secure.

Today, billions of devices are interconnected and operate in increasingly diverse and complex environments requiring workloads to execute seamlessly between different architectures, with data moving through a multitude of hierarchies. To address these challenges, our product strategy focuses on three areas: foundational security, workload protection and software reliability.

We start with a solid foundation of security to build upon. Intel has delivered security engines being used more than a billion times worldwide. Our platforms have features such as Intel® OS Guard, BIOS Guard and Boot Guard, which help them start up correctly and verify that it is running as expected. These and other technologies are the building blocks that provide ways to verify trustworthiness of devices and data.

Once a platform has started correctly, the next step is to protect workloads. These workloads vary depending on the environment, and to help protect data that moves through them, we continue to build upon silicon-based control schemes that optimize security and performance in foundational technologies. One such example of this is the work Intel is doing to accelerate the use and performance of stronger cryptographic algorithms that encrypt data.

The primary way attackers get into systems continues to be through something they can scale — and that is software. Intel has a history of improving software reliability by building silicon enhancements realized through logic inside the processor. These architectural advancements can result in considerably less execution overhead compared to software-only implementations. A recent example of this work is the release of Intel® Control-flow Enforcement Technology, which helps find the weaknesses that lead to common malware attack methods that have been a challenge to mitigate with software alone.

Security solutions rooted in hardware provide the greatest opportunity to provide security assurance against current and future threats. Intel hardware, and the added assurance and security innovation it brings, helps to harden the layers of the computing stack.

Intel is shaping the future of computing and communications technologies that are the foundation of the world’s innovations. Our success relies on the success of our customers and it is though our ongoing commitment and investment that we earn our customers’ trust.

Martin G. Dixon is an Intel fellow and vice president in the Intel Security Architecture and Engineering Group at Intel Corporation.

1 IDC’s Worldwide Security Spending Guide, 2020V2, July 2020.

The post People, Processes, Products Define Intel’s Security Strategy appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Media Alert: Intel at RSAC 2020

Join Intel at RSA Conference 2020 in San Francisco to learn firsthand how, together with partners and customers, Intel is building the trusted foundation for computing in a data-centric world.

RSAC 2020
When: Feb. 24-28, 2020

Where: Moscone Center, San Francisco

RSAC Speaking Session: Security Policy and Regulation Trends for Developers
sm elazari Dr. Amit Elazari, Intel director of global cybersecurity policy, will introduce the developer audience to the variety and influx of legal and regulatory concepts and proposals shaping the future of security focusing on recent trends. Highlights will include coordinated vulnerability disclosure, frameworks for secure development, supply chain transparency, researchers’ collaboration, IoT Security, anti-hacking laws, standards efforts and more. We will also talk about bug bounties and vulnerability disclosure, what are some of the industry best practices in this area, and how developers can foster the implementation of these programs at your organization to foster security, collaboration and transparency.

When: Feb. 24, 2020, 12:15 p.m. PT

Where: Moscone West, RSA DevSec Track

RSAC Speaking Session: Protect Privacy in a Data-Driven World: Privacy-Preserving Machine Learning
Intel Casimir Wierzynski Casimir Wierzynski, senior director, Office of the CTO, AI Products Group at Intel, will discuss how with the explosion of data, machine learning has enabled highly sophisticated methods for re-identifying anonymized data. These techniques make data breaches more consequential, requiring government intervention (GPDR, CCPA). But combining AI and privacy doesn’t have to be a zero sum game. An exciting set of emerging techniques known as Privacy Preserving Machine Learning (PPML) enables unlocking the power of AI while maintaining data privacy and confidentiality. These techniques come with much higher computation, communication and storage requirements.

When: Feb. 25, 2020, 1-1:50 p.m. PT

Where: Moscone West

RSAC Speaking Session: Nowhere to Hide: How HW Telemetry and ML Can Make Life Tough for Exploits
Intel Rahuldeva Ghosh
Intel Zheng Zhang
Hardware can reveal the execution of even the best concealed malicious code at an instruction level. In this talk Rahuldeva Ghosh (upper left), senior staff architect at Intel, and Zheng Zhang, engineering manager at Intel, will go into the details of how scalable, deployable, runtime threat and anomaly detection solutions can be built with CPU telemetry and machine learning. Specifics of telemetry sources, feature selection, overhead management and platform domain specific design considerations will be discussed.

When: Feb. 25, 2020, 3:40-4:30 p.m. PT

Where: Moscone West

RSAC Speaking Session: “I’m Still Standing,” Says Each Cyber-Resilient Device
Intel Abhilasha Bhargav Spantzel
Intel Nivedita Aggarwal
In this discussion, Abhilasha Bhargav-Spantzel (upper left), principal engineer at Intel, and Nivedita Aggarwal, senior firmware engineer at Intel, will visit the key aspects of a resilient computer system, provide industry standard examples and highlight key learnings from multiple engineering disciplines to rethink resilience in the cyberworld. The hypothesis is that it will allow a path forward to combat the increasing number of cyberthreats that have a high impact on our computer solutions and services.

When: Feb. 27, 2020, 8-8:50 a.m. PT

Where: Moscone West

 

More: Attend RSAC 2020 | Intel Security News

Contact:

Megan Phelan
Highwire Public Relations
916-834-0802
megan@highwirepr.com

The post Media Alert: Intel at RSAC 2020 appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

New Global Cybersecurity Report Reveals Misaligned Incentives, Executive Overconfidence Create Advantages for Attacker

Click to view full infographic
Click to view full infographic

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • New report from Intel Security, CSIS finds three key areas of misaligned incentives that advantage cybercriminals.
  • Attackers thrive in a fluid, decentralized market, while bureaucracy constrains defenders.
  • 93 percent of organizations surveyed have a cybersecurity strategy, but only 49 percent have fully implemented it.
  • Nearly 60 percent of IT executives believe their cybersecurity strategy is fully implemented, while just over 30 percent of IT staff agree.
  • Senior executives designing cyber strategies measure success differently than implementers.

WASHINGTON, March 1, 2017 – Intel Security, in partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), today released “Tilting the Playing Field: How Misaligned Incentives Work Against Cybersecurity,” a global report and survey revealing three categories of misaligned incentives: corporate structures versus the free flow of criminal enterprises; strategy versus implementation; and senior executives versus those in implementation roles. The report highlights ways organizations can learn from cybercriminals to correct these misalignments.

Based on interviews and a global survey of 800 cybersecurity professionals from five industry sectors, the report outlines how cybercriminals have the advantage, thanks to the incentives for cybercrime creating a big business in a fluid and dynamic marketplace. Defenders on the other hand, often operate in bureaucratic hierarchies, making them hard-pressed to keep up.

Additional misalignments occur within defenders’ organizations. For instance, while more than 90 percent of organizations report having a cybersecurity strategy, less than half have fully implemented them. Moreover, 83 percent say their organizations have been affected by cybersecurity breaches, indicating a disconnect between strategy and implementation.

And while cybercriminals have a direct incentive for their work, the survey not only shows there are few incentives for cybersecurity professionals, but that executives are much more confident than operational staff about the effectiveness of the existing incentives. For example, 42 percent of cybersecurity implementers report that no incentives exist, compared to only 18 percent of decision-makers and eight percent of leaders.

“The cybercriminal market is primed for success by its very structure, which rapidly rewards innovation and promotes sharing of the best tools,” said Candace Worley, vice president of enterprise solutions for Intel Security. “For IT and cyber professionals in government and business to compete with attackers, they need to be as nimble and agile as the criminals they seek to apprehend, and provide incentives that IT staff value.”

“It’s easy to come up with a strategy, but execution is tough,” said Denise Zheng, director and senior fellow, technology policy program at CSIS. “How governments and companies address their misaligned incentives will dictate the effectiveness of their cybersecurity programs. It’s not a matter of ‘what’ needs to be done, but rather determining ‘why’ it’s not getting done, and ‘how’ to do it better.”

Other key findings of the report include the following:

  • Non-executives are three times more likely than executives to view shortfalls in funding and staffing as causing problems for the implementation of their cybersecurity strategy.
  • Even though incentives for cybersecurity professionals are lacking, 65 percent are personally motivated to strengthen their organizations’ cybersecurity.
  • Ninety-five percent of organizations have experienced effects of cybersecurity breaches, including disruption of operations, loss of IP, harm to reputation and company brand, among other effects. But only 32 percent report experiencing revenue or profit loss, which could lead to a false sense of security.
  • The government sector was the least likely to report having a fully implemented cybersecurity strategy (38 percent). This sector also reports having a higher share of agencies with inadequate funding (58 percent) and staff (63 percent) than the private sector (33 percent and 43 percent, respectively).

The report also suggests ways the defender community can learn from the attacker communities. These include:

  • Opting for security-as-a-service to counter cybercrime-as-a-service
  • Using public disclosure
  • Increasing transparency
  • Lowering barriers to entry for the cyber talent pool
  • Aligning performance incentives from senior leadership down to operators

The good news, according to the report’s authors, is that most companies recognize the seriousness of the cybersecurity problem and are willing to address it. Organizations need more than tools to combat cyberattackers; experimentation is necessary to determine the right mix of metrics and incentives for each organization as they approach cybersecurity through more than just a cost-conscious framework and become more innovative in their organizational structure and processes.

For more information about these findings and to view the full report, visit www.mcafee.com/misaligned.

Methodology

Intel commissioned independent technology market research specialist Vanson Bourne to undertake the research upon which this report is based. Intel surveyed more than 800 respondents from companies ranging in size from 500 employees to more than 5,000 across five major industry sectors, including finance, health care and the public sector. The survey targeted respondents with executive-level responsibility for cybersecurity as well as operators who have technical and implementation responsibilities for cybersecurity. Countries represented by respondents include Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, United Kingdom and United States.

About Intel Security

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries. 

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

The post New Global Cybersecurity Report Reveals Misaligned Incentives, Executive Overconfidence Create Advantages for Attacker appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

New Global Cybersecurity Report Reveals Misaligned Incentives, Executive Overconfidence Create Advantages for Attacker

Click to view full infographic
Click to view full infographic

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • New report from Intel Security, CSIS finds three key areas of misaligned incentives that advantage cybercriminals.
  • Attackers thrive in a fluid, decentralized market, while bureaucracy constrains defenders.
  • 93 percent of organizations surveyed have a cybersecurity strategy, but only 49 percent have fully implemented it.
  • Nearly 60 percent of IT executives believe their cybersecurity strategy is fully implemented, while just over 30 percent of IT staff agree.
  • Senior executives designing cyber strategies measure success differently than implementers.

WASHINGTON, March 1, 2017 – Intel Security, in partnership with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), today released “Tilting the Playing Field: How Misaligned Incentives Work Against Cybersecurity,” a global report and survey revealing three categories of misaligned incentives: corporate structures versus the free flow of criminal enterprises; strategy versus implementation; and senior executives versus those in implementation roles. The report highlights ways organizations can learn from cybercriminals to correct these misalignments.

Based on interviews and a global survey of 800 cybersecurity professionals from five industry sectors, the report outlines how cybercriminals have the advantage, thanks to the incentives for cybercrime creating a big business in a fluid and dynamic marketplace. Defenders on the other hand, often operate in bureaucratic hierarchies, making them hard-pressed to keep up.

Additional misalignments occur within defenders’ organizations. For instance, while more than 90 percent of organizations report having a cybersecurity strategy, less than half have fully implemented them. Moreover, 83 percent say their organizations have been affected by cybersecurity breaches, indicating a disconnect between strategy and implementation.

And while cybercriminals have a direct incentive for their work, the survey not only shows there are few incentives for cybersecurity professionals, but that executives are much more confident than operational staff about the effectiveness of the existing incentives. For example, 42 percent of cybersecurity implementers report that no incentives exist, compared to only 18 percent of decision-makers and eight percent of leaders.

“The cybercriminal market is primed for success by its very structure, which rapidly rewards innovation and promotes sharing of the best tools,” said Candace Worley, vice president of enterprise solutions for Intel Security. “For IT and cyber professionals in government and business to compete with attackers, they need to be as nimble and agile as the criminals they seek to apprehend, and provide incentives that IT staff value.”

“It’s easy to come up with a strategy, but execution is tough,” said Denise Zheng, director and senior fellow, technology policy program at CSIS. “How governments and companies address their misaligned incentives will dictate the effectiveness of their cybersecurity programs. It’s not a matter of ‘what’ needs to be done, but rather determining ‘why’ it’s not getting done, and ‘how’ to do it better.”

Other key findings of the report include the following:

  • Non-executives are three times more likely than executives to view shortfalls in funding and staffing as causing problems for the implementation of their cybersecurity strategy.
  • Even though incentives for cybersecurity professionals are lacking, 65 percent are personally motivated to strengthen their organizations’ cybersecurity.
  • Ninety-five percent of organizations have experienced effects of cybersecurity breaches, including disruption of operations, loss of IP, harm to reputation and company brand, among other effects. But only 32 percent report experiencing revenue or profit loss, which could lead to a false sense of security.
  • The government sector was the least likely to report having a fully implemented cybersecurity strategy (38 percent). This sector also reports having a higher share of agencies with inadequate funding (58 percent) and staff (63 percent) than the private sector (33 percent and 43 percent, respectively).

The report also suggests ways the defender community can learn from the attacker communities. These include:

  • Opting for security-as-a-service to counter cybercrime-as-a-service
  • Using public disclosure
  • Increasing transparency
  • Lowering barriers to entry for the cyber talent pool
  • Aligning performance incentives from senior leadership down to operators

The good news, according to the report’s authors, is that most companies recognize the seriousness of the cybersecurity problem and are willing to address it. Organizations need more than tools to combat cyberattackers; experimentation is necessary to determine the right mix of metrics and incentives for each organization as they approach cybersecurity through more than just a cost-conscious framework and become more innovative in their organizational structure and processes.

For more information about these findings and to view the full report, visit www.mcafee.com/misaligned.

Methodology

Intel commissioned independent technology market research specialist Vanson Bourne to undertake the research upon which this report is based. Intel surveyed more than 800 respondents from companies ranging in size from 500 employees to more than 5,000 across five major industry sectors, including finance, health care and the public sector. The survey targeted respondents with executive-level responsibility for cybersecurity as well as operators who have technical and implementation responsibilities for cybersecurity. Countries represented by respondents include Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, United Kingdom and United States.

About Intel Security

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries. 

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

The post New Global Cybersecurity Report Reveals Misaligned Incentives, Executive Overconfidence Create Advantages for Attacker appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Intel Security Mends Cybersecurity Fragmentation with Unifying Strategy

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • “Together is Power” comes to life with integrated, automated solutions, expansive partner ecosystems and cross-industry collaboration
  • Available now new McAfee® Enterprise Security Manager 10
  • McAfee® Virtual Network Security Platform delivers comprehensive security for AWS*
  • Intel Security Innovation Alliance announces 15 new partners
  • New open source software promotes industry adoption of OpenDXL
  • Intel Security now integrated with the new Cyber Threat Alliance Platform

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 14, 2017 – Today Intel Security outlined a new, unifying approach for the cybersecurity industry that strives to eliminate fragmentation through updated integrated solutions, new cross-industry partnerships and product integrations within the Intel Security Innovation Alliance and Cyber Threat Alliance (CTA).

“Transforming isolated technologies into a cohesive security system is without a doubt the most daunting challenge facing practitioners today,” said Chris Young, senior vice president and general manager of Intel Security Group. “The battle against our adversaries cannot be fought alone; it will take people, products, organizations and industries working together to eliminate the fragmentation of security through automation, partnerships and unified architectures.”

The workforce shortage facing the cybersecurity industry makes it increasingly difficult to hire and retain employees. These scarce resources make it harder to maintain a coherent security architecture to prevent damage from and minimize the cost of emerging threats while embracing the potential of new open source, digital, cloud and security technologies.

Our research and customer discussions have underscored the need for trusted partners that work cooperatively to reduce the burden of fragmented technologies and help organizations stay focused on securing their business assets and productivity. With this in mind, Intel Security is pleased to announce several new product integrations and updates, new industry partnerships and increased open source and standards-based collaboration that will strengthen the effectiveness of cybersecurity infrastructure across the industry’s largest open ecosystem.

Integrated Solutions

At the heart of a unified strategy for cybersecurity is the need for integrated solutions that tie into the enterprise’s framework to address top-of-mind challenges. Intel Security announces new and updated solutions that do exactly that: McAfeeâ Enterprise Security Manager (ESM) 10 and McAfee® Virtual Network Security Platform (vNSP).

With the high cost of detecting and resolving cyberattacks, the need for SIEM solutions that are intelligent and intuitive has never been greater. The newly released McAfee ESM 10 joins an expanded McAfee® Foundstone™ security operations center (SOC) services portfolio to help security analysts to be far more effective. New capabilities include:

  • Intuitive and Collaborative User Interface: A new user interface reflects extensive incident management workflow usability testing, delivering on increased efficiency, faster and more effective threat detection and response, and the ability to manage multiple incidents within the same dashboard.
  • Contextual Threat Intelligence: Significant advancements have improved ongoing contextual threat intelligence and immediate access to critical threat data to identify, scope and orchestrate responses to emerging attacks.
  • Trusted Expertise Offerings: Foundstone threat researchers (i.e., Intel Security’s expert security consultants) can now augment staffing as part of a virtual SOC offering, adding expertise, capacity and coverage to supplement existing enterprise capabilities and extending the Foundstone services lifecycle SOC portfolio.

The need for advanced malware protection within the public cloud environment calls for integrated virtual solutions. McAfee® vNSP now extends virtual network protection to Amazon Web Services* (AWS) cloud and OpenStack* cloud deployments, with new simplified multi-cloud licensing, easily protecting virtual networks. New capabilities include:

  • Virtual Network Protection for Public Clouds: McAfee vNSP is an industry-leading solution that protects AWS workloads from attacks like zero-day, bots, malware and application-level DOS with both detection and protection mode. It integrates seamlessly with AWS Auto Scaling to deliver a fully scalable security solution with a single pane of glass.
  • Virtual Network Traffic Inspection for Private Clouds: vNSP continues to add support for multi-hypervisor platforms, which now includes VMware® ESX®, VMware NSX™ and OpenStack cloud with its best-of-breed next-generation IPS. Security Operations can now manage their public and private cloud security from a single network security management console giving them full visibility.
  • Cloud-Based Threat Analysis: New integration with McAfee® Cloud Threat Detection allows McAfee® Network Security Platform (NSP) to easily and efficiently augment existing inspection capabilities with sophisticated cloud-based malware analysis.

Ecosystem Momentum and Cross-Industry Collaboration 

Transforming fragmentation requires the industry to work cooperatively to build meaningful integrations. Today, the Intel Security Innovation Alliance, the industry’s premier technology partnering program, announces 15 new partnerships, bringing the total number of partners to more than 135 globally. Over the past year, 35 partners have integrated or planned integrations with the McAfee Data Exchange Layer (DXL), the industry-endorsed communication fabric, providing real-time interaction between applications.

Since announcing the OpenDXL initiative – an open industry standard for all developers to increase integration flexibility, simplicity and opportunity – Intel Security has expanded its commitment to open source and community adoption. Today, Intel Security is publishing more open source software on github.com/opendxl to further reduce high-integration complexity and cost, and replacing lengthy manual and repetitive processes for enterprises. These advancements include:

  • New Integrations: New open source connectors for McAfeeâ Threat Intelligence Exchange (TIE) and McAfeeâ Active Response (MAR) let applications easily use these tools to search endpoints and query and set file reputations, simplifying the process of querying endpoints within the enterprise environment to just 20 lines of code.
  • Expedited Availability: Responding to customer demand, Intel Security has expedited availability of the OpenDXL Python client, which is now available for organizations to download, develop and deploy with confidence. For demonstrations of technology integrations using OpenDXL, visit the Intel Security booth at #N3801 – North Hall of the Moscone Center.
  • New Capabilities: New OpenDXL connectors for McAfeeâ ePolicy Orchestrator® (McAfee® ePO™) platform APIs enable easy, fast options to apply policies, tag systems, move groups and trigger actions within the industry-leading security platform. The new capabilities open up the most frequently used capabilities of the McAfee ePO platform web APIs, and permit more applications to leverage centralized and efficient management with a lightweight integration process.
  • New Partnerships: With the goal to improve cybersecurity efficiencies and maximize protection, 15 new companies have joined the Intel Security Innovation Alliance: Absolute Software*, Bay Dynamics*, Cyphort*, DFLabs*, Digicert*, Dropbox*, io*, Fireglass*, Kaspersky*, Opswat*, Radware*, SailPoint*, SAS Institute*, SS8 Networks* and ThreatConnect*.

Intel Security also announced that it is now sharing and consuming advanced threat intelligence through the Cyber Threat Alliance Platform (CTAP) and that it has a plan to further integrate CTAP with its products. CTAP is a platform that scores and shares threat intelligence among members of the Cyber Threat Alliance.

Shared CTAP Indicators of Compromise help Intel Security and other CTA members detect and better understand new, emerging attack campaigns. This allows CTA members to more quickly protect their customers’ systems.

As announced earlier today by the Cyber Threat Alliance, it is now formally incorporated as an independent, 501(c)(6) entity, with a president, board of directors and permanent standing committees. It is generously funded by the founding members – Intel Security, Fortinet*, Palo Alto Networks*, Symantec*, Check Point* and Cisco Systems*. Each founding member has committed $1 million over the next two years to the success of the Cyber Threat Alliance.

For more information on McAfee ESM 10, visit mcafee.com/esm.

For more information on McAfee vNSP, visit mcafee.com/us/products/virtual-network-security-platform.aspx.

For more information on McAfee NSP, visit mcafee.com/us/products/network-security-platform.aspx.

For more information on the Intel Security Innovation Alliance, visit securingtomorrow.mcafee.com/business/sia-ecosystem-updates.

For more information on the OpenDXL initiative, visit mcafee.com/dxl.

For more information on the Cyber Threat Alliance, see the full announcement at http://cyberthreatalliance.org.

For all press materials related to Intel Security’s RSA announcement, visit https://newsroom.intel.com/press-kits/2017-rsa/.

About Intel Security

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel. www.mcafee.com

Intel Security technologies’ features and benefits depend on system configuration and may require enabled hardware, software, or service activation. Learn more at intelsecurity.com. No computer system can be absolutely secure. This document contains information on products, services and/or processes in development. All information provided here is subject to change without notice. Contact your Intel Security representative to obtain the latest forecast, schedule, specifications, and roadmaps.

 

Intel, the Intel logo, McAfee and the McAfee logo are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

Amazon Web Services and AWS are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries.

The OpenStack Word Mark is either a registered trademark/service mark or trademark/service mark of the OpenStack Foundation, in the United States and other countries and are used with the OpenStack Foundation’s permission. Intel is not affiliated with, endorsed or sponsored by the OpenStack Foundation, or the OpenStack community.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

The post Intel Security Mends Cybersecurity Fragmentation with Unifying Strategy appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Intel Security Mends Cybersecurity Fragmentation with Unifying Strategy

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • “Together is Power” comes to life with integrated, automated solutions, expansive partner ecosystems and cross-industry collaboration
  • Available now new McAfee® Enterprise Security Manager 10
  • McAfee® Virtual Network Security Platform delivers comprehensive security for AWS*
  • Intel Security Innovation Alliance announces 15 new partners
  • New open source software promotes industry adoption of OpenDXL
  • Intel Security now integrated with the new Cyber Threat Alliance Platform

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 14, 2017 – Today Intel Security outlined a new, unifying approach for the cybersecurity industry that strives to eliminate fragmentation through updated integrated solutions, new cross-industry partnerships and product integrations within the Intel Security Innovation Alliance and Cyber Threat Alliance (CTA).

“Transforming isolated technologies into a cohesive security system is without a doubt the most daunting challenge facing practitioners today,” said Chris Young, senior vice president and general manager of Intel Security Group. “The battle against our adversaries cannot be fought alone; it will take people, products, organizations and industries working together to eliminate the fragmentation of security through automation, partnerships and unified architectures.”

The workforce shortage facing the cybersecurity industry makes it increasingly difficult to hire and retain employees. These scarce resources make it harder to maintain a coherent security architecture to prevent damage from and minimize the cost of emerging threats while embracing the potential of new open source, digital, cloud and security technologies.

Our research and customer discussions have underscored the need for trusted partners that work cooperatively to reduce the burden of fragmented technologies and help organizations stay focused on securing their business assets and productivity. With this in mind, Intel Security is pleased to announce several new product integrations and updates, new industry partnerships and increased open source and standards-based collaboration that will strengthen the effectiveness of cybersecurity infrastructure across the industry’s largest open ecosystem.

Integrated Solutions

At the heart of a unified strategy for cybersecurity is the need for integrated solutions that tie into the enterprise’s framework to address top-of-mind challenges. Intel Security announces new and updated solutions that do exactly that: McAfeeâ Enterprise Security Manager (ESM) 10 and McAfee® Virtual Network Security Platform (vNSP).

With the high cost of detecting and resolving cyberattacks, the need for SIEM solutions that are intelligent and intuitive has never been greater. The newly released McAfee ESM 10 joins an expanded McAfee® Foundstone™ security operations center (SOC) services portfolio to help security analysts to be far more effective. New capabilities include:

  • Intuitive and Collaborative User Interface: A new user interface reflects extensive incident management workflow usability testing, delivering on increased efficiency, faster and more effective threat detection and response, and the ability to manage multiple incidents within the same dashboard.
  • Contextual Threat Intelligence: Significant advancements have improved ongoing contextual threat intelligence and immediate access to critical threat data to identify, scope and orchestrate responses to emerging attacks.
  • Trusted Expertise Offerings: Foundstone threat researchers (i.e., Intel Security’s expert security consultants) can now augment staffing as part of a virtual SOC offering, adding expertise, capacity and coverage to supplement existing enterprise capabilities and extending the Foundstone services lifecycle SOC portfolio.

The need for advanced malware protection within the public cloud environment calls for integrated virtual solutions. McAfee® vNSP now extends virtual network protection to Amazon Web Services* (AWS) cloud and OpenStack* cloud deployments, with new simplified multi-cloud licensing, easily protecting virtual networks. New capabilities include:

  • Virtual Network Protection for Public Clouds: McAfee vNSP is an industry-leading solution that protects AWS workloads from attacks like zero-day, bots, malware and application-level DOS with both detection and protection mode. It integrates seamlessly with AWS Auto Scaling to deliver a fully scalable security solution with a single pane of glass.
  • Virtual Network Traffic Inspection for Private Clouds: vNSP continues to add support for multi-hypervisor platforms, which now includes VMware® ESX®, VMware NSX™ and OpenStack cloud with its best-of-breed next-generation IPS. Security Operations can now manage their public and private cloud security from a single network security management console giving them full visibility.
  • Cloud-Based Threat Analysis: New integration with McAfee® Cloud Threat Detection allows McAfee® Network Security Platform (NSP) to easily and efficiently augment existing inspection capabilities with sophisticated cloud-based malware analysis.

Ecosystem Momentum and Cross-Industry Collaboration 

Transforming fragmentation requires the industry to work cooperatively to build meaningful integrations. Today, the Intel Security Innovation Alliance, the industry’s premier technology partnering program, announces 15 new partnerships, bringing the total number of partners to more than 135 globally. Over the past year, 35 partners have integrated or planned integrations with the McAfee Data Exchange Layer (DXL), the industry-endorsed communication fabric, providing real-time interaction between applications.

Since announcing the OpenDXL initiative – an open industry standard for all developers to increase integration flexibility, simplicity and opportunity – Intel Security has expanded its commitment to open source and community adoption. Today, Intel Security is publishing more open source software on github.com/opendxl to further reduce high-integration complexity and cost, and replacing lengthy manual and repetitive processes for enterprises. These advancements include:

  • New Integrations: New open source connectors for McAfeeâ Threat Intelligence Exchange (TIE) and McAfeeâ Active Response (MAR) let applications easily use these tools to search endpoints and query and set file reputations, simplifying the process of querying endpoints within the enterprise environment to just 20 lines of code.
  • Expedited Availability: Responding to customer demand, Intel Security has expedited availability of the OpenDXL Python client, which is now available for organizations to download, develop and deploy with confidence. For demonstrations of technology integrations using OpenDXL, visit the Intel Security booth at #N3801 – North Hall of the Moscone Center.
  • New Capabilities: New OpenDXL connectors for McAfeeâ ePolicy Orchestrator® (McAfee® ePO™) platform APIs enable easy, fast options to apply policies, tag systems, move groups and trigger actions within the industry-leading security platform. The new capabilities open up the most frequently used capabilities of the McAfee ePO platform web APIs, and permit more applications to leverage centralized and efficient management with a lightweight integration process.
  • New Partnerships: With the goal to improve cybersecurity efficiencies and maximize protection, 15 new companies have joined the Intel Security Innovation Alliance: Absolute Software*, Bay Dynamics*, Cyphort*, DFLabs*, Digicert*, Dropbox*, io*, Fireglass*, Kaspersky*, Opswat*, Radware*, SailPoint*, SAS Institute*, SS8 Networks* and ThreatConnect*.

Intel Security also announced that it is now sharing and consuming advanced threat intelligence through the Cyber Threat Alliance Platform (CTAP) and that it has a plan to further integrate CTAP with its products. CTAP is a platform that scores and shares threat intelligence among members of the Cyber Threat Alliance.

Shared CTAP Indicators of Compromise help Intel Security and other CTA members detect and better understand new, emerging attack campaigns. This allows CTA members to more quickly protect their customers’ systems.

As announced earlier today by the Cyber Threat Alliance, it is now formally incorporated as an independent, 501(c)(6) entity, with a president, board of directors and permanent standing committees. It is generously funded by the founding members – Intel Security, Fortinet*, Palo Alto Networks*, Symantec*, Check Point* and Cisco Systems*. Each founding member has committed $1 million over the next two years to the success of the Cyber Threat Alliance.

For more information on McAfee ESM 10, visit mcafee.com/esm.

For more information on McAfee vNSP, visit mcafee.com/us/products/virtual-network-security-platform.aspx.

For more information on McAfee NSP, visit mcafee.com/us/products/network-security-platform.aspx.

For more information on the Intel Security Innovation Alliance, visit securingtomorrow.mcafee.com/business/sia-ecosystem-updates.

For more information on the OpenDXL initiative, visit mcafee.com/dxl.

For more information on the Cyber Threat Alliance, see the full announcement at http://cyberthreatalliance.org.

For all press materials related to Intel Security’s RSA announcement, visit https://newsroom.intel.com/press-kits/2017-rsa/.

About Intel Security

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel. www.mcafee.com

Intel Security technologies’ features and benefits depend on system configuration and may require enabled hardware, software, or service activation. Learn more at intelsecurity.com. No computer system can be absolutely secure. This document contains information on products, services and/or processes in development. All information provided here is subject to change without notice. Contact your Intel Security representative to obtain the latest forecast, schedule, specifications, and roadmaps.

 

Intel, the Intel logo, McAfee and the McAfee logo are registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

Amazon Web Services and AWS are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates in the United States and/or other countries.

The OpenStack Word Mark is either a registered trademark/service mark or trademark/service mark of the OpenStack Foundation, in the United States and other countries and are used with the OpenStack Foundation’s permission. Intel is not affiliated with, endorsed or sponsored by the OpenStack Foundation, or the OpenStack community.

*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

The post Intel Security Mends Cybersecurity Fragmentation with Unifying Strategy appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

New Intel Security Cloud Report Reveals IT Departments Find It Hard to Keep the Cloud Safe

Click on image to see the full infographic: “Building Trust in a Cloudy Sky.”

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Trust now outnumbers distrust for public clouds by more than 2-to-1.
  • 49 percent of professionals slowed cloud adoption due to a lack of cybersecurity skills.
  • 65 percent think Shadow IT is interfering with keeping the cloud safe and secure.
  • 52 percent indicate a malware infection can be tracked to a cloud application.
  • 62 percent store sensitive customer information in the public cloud.

RSA SECURITY CONFERENCE, San Francisco, Feb. 13, 2017 – Intel Security today announced its second annual cloud security report, “Building Trust in a Cloudy Sky.” The report outlines the current state of cloud adoption, the primary concerns with private and public cloud services, security implications, and the evolving impact of Shadow IT of the more than 2,000 IT professionals surveyed

“The ‘Cloud First’ strategy is now well and truly ensconced into the architecture of many organizations across the world,” said Raj Samani, EMEA chief technology officer, Intel Security. “The desire to move quickly toward cloud computing appears to be on the agenda for most organizations. This year, the average time before respondents thought their IT budgets would be 80 percent cloud-based was 15 months, indicating that Cloud First for many companies is progressing and remains the objective.”

Trust in the Cloud on the Rise

The trust and perception of public cloud services continues to improve year over year. Most organizations view cloud services as or more secure than private clouds, and more likely to deliver lower costs of ownership and overall data visibility. Those who trust public clouds now outnumber those who distrust public clouds by more than 2-to-1. Improved trust and perception, as well as increased understanding of the risks by senior management, is encouraging more organizations to store sensitive data in the public cloud. Personal customer information is the most likely type of data to be stored in public clouds, kept there by 62 percent of those surveyed.

Risks Also Rise: Shadow IT and the Cybersecurity Skill Shortage

The ongoing shortage of security skills is continuing to affect cloud deployments. Almost half of the organizations surveyed report the lack of cybersecurity skills has slowed adoption or usage of cloud services, possibly contributing to the increase in Shadow IT activities. Another 36 percent report they are experiencing a scarcity but are continuing with their cloud activities regardless. Only 15 percent of those surveyed state they do not have a skills shortage.

Due to the ease of procurement, almost 40 percent of cloud services are now commissioned without the involvement of IT, and unfortunately, visibility of these Shadow IT services has dropped from about 50 percent last year to just under 47 percent this year. As a result, 65 percent of IT professionals think this phenomenon is interfering with their ability to keep the cloud safe and secure. This is not surprising given the amount of sensitive data now being stored in the public cloud and more than half (52 percent) of respondents reporting they have definitively tracked malware from a cloud SaaS application.

Data Center Progression

The number of organizations using private cloud only has dropped from 51 percent to 24 percent over the past year, while hybrid cloud use has increased from 19 percent to 57 percent. This move to a hybrid private/public cloud architecture requires the data center to evolve to a highly virtualized, cloud-based infrastructure. On average, 52 percent of an organization’s data center servers are virtualized, 80 percent are using containers and most expect to have the conversion to a fully software-defined data center completed within two years.

Recommendations:

  • Attackers will look for the easiest targets, regardless of whether they are public, private or hybrid. Integrated or unified security solutions that provide visibility across all of the organization’s services could be the best defense.
  • User credentials, especially for administrators, will be the most likely form of attack. Organizations need to ensure they are using authentication best practices, such as distinct passwords, multi-factor authentication and even biometrics where available.
  • Security technologies such as data loss prevention, encryption and cloud access security brokers (CASBs) remain underutilized. Integrating these tools with an existing security system increases visibility, enables discovery of shadow services, and provides options for automatic protection of sensitive data at rest and in motion throughout any type of environment.
  • Organizations need to evolve toward a risk management and mitigation approach to information security. They should consider adopting a Cloud First strategy to encourage adoption of cloud services to reduce costs and increase flexibility, and put security operations in a proactive position instead of a reactive one.

Find More Information:

Survey Methodology

In fall 2016, Intel Security surveyed over 2,000 IT professionals across a broad set of industries, countries and organization sizes. Research participants were senior technical decision-makers from small, medium and large organizations located in Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States.

About Intel Security

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

No computer system can be absolutely secure.

The post New Intel Security Cloud Report Reveals IT Departments Find It Hard to Keep the Cloud Safe appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

New Intel Security Cloud Report Reveals IT Departments Find It Hard to Keep the Cloud Safe

Click on image to see the full infographic: “Building Trust in a Cloudy Sky.”

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Trust now outnumbers distrust for public clouds by more than 2-to-1.
  • 49 percent of professionals slowed cloud adoption due to a lack of cybersecurity skills.
  • 65 percent think Shadow IT is interfering with keeping the cloud safe and secure.
  • 52 percent indicate a malware infection can be tracked to a cloud application.
  • 62 percent store sensitive customer information in the public cloud.

RSA SECURITY CONFERENCE, San Francisco, Feb. 13, 2017 – Intel Security today announced its second annual cloud security report, “Building Trust in a Cloudy Sky.” The report outlines the current state of cloud adoption, the primary concerns with private and public cloud services, security implications, and the evolving impact of Shadow IT of the more than 2,000 IT professionals surveyed

“The ‘Cloud First’ strategy is now well and truly ensconced into the architecture of many organizations across the world,” said Raj Samani, EMEA chief technology officer, Intel Security. “The desire to move quickly toward cloud computing appears to be on the agenda for most organizations. This year, the average time before respondents thought their IT budgets would be 80 percent cloud-based was 15 months, indicating that Cloud First for many companies is progressing and remains the objective.”

Trust in the Cloud on the Rise

The trust and perception of public cloud services continues to improve year over year. Most organizations view cloud services as or more secure than private clouds, and more likely to deliver lower costs of ownership and overall data visibility. Those who trust public clouds now outnumber those who distrust public clouds by more than 2-to-1. Improved trust and perception, as well as increased understanding of the risks by senior management, is encouraging more organizations to store sensitive data in the public cloud. Personal customer information is the most likely type of data to be stored in public clouds, kept there by 62 percent of those surveyed.

Risks Also Rise: Shadow IT and the Cybersecurity Skill Shortage

The ongoing shortage of security skills is continuing to affect cloud deployments. Almost half of the organizations surveyed report the lack of cybersecurity skills has slowed adoption or usage of cloud services, possibly contributing to the increase in Shadow IT activities. Another 36 percent report they are experiencing a scarcity but are continuing with their cloud activities regardless. Only 15 percent of those surveyed state they do not have a skills shortage.

Due to the ease of procurement, almost 40 percent of cloud services are now commissioned without the involvement of IT, and unfortunately, visibility of these Shadow IT services has dropped from about 50 percent last year to just under 47 percent this year. As a result, 65 percent of IT professionals think this phenomenon is interfering with their ability to keep the cloud safe and secure. This is not surprising given the amount of sensitive data now being stored in the public cloud and more than half (52 percent) of respondents reporting they have definitively tracked malware from a cloud SaaS application.

Data Center Progression

The number of organizations using private cloud only has dropped from 51 percent to 24 percent over the past year, while hybrid cloud use has increased from 19 percent to 57 percent. This move to a hybrid private/public cloud architecture requires the data center to evolve to a highly virtualized, cloud-based infrastructure. On average, 52 percent of an organization’s data center servers are virtualized, 80 percent are using containers and most expect to have the conversion to a fully software-defined data center completed within two years.

Recommendations:

  • Attackers will look for the easiest targets, regardless of whether they are public, private or hybrid. Integrated or unified security solutions that provide visibility across all of the organization’s services could be the best defense.
  • User credentials, especially for administrators, will be the most likely form of attack. Organizations need to ensure they are using authentication best practices, such as distinct passwords, multi-factor authentication and even biometrics where available.
  • Security technologies such as data loss prevention, encryption and cloud access security brokers (CASBs) remain underutilized. Integrating these tools with an existing security system increases visibility, enables discovery of shadow services, and provides options for automatic protection of sensitive data at rest and in motion throughout any type of environment.
  • Organizations need to evolve toward a risk management and mitigation approach to information security. They should consider adopting a Cloud First strategy to encourage adoption of cloud services to reduce costs and increase flexibility, and put security operations in a proactive position instead of a reactive one.

Find More Information:

Survey Methodology

In fall 2016, Intel Security surveyed over 2,000 IT professionals across a broad set of industries, countries and organization sizes. Research participants were senior technical decision-makers from small, medium and large organizations located in Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States.

About Intel Security

Intel Security, with its McAfee product line, is dedicated to making the digital world safer and more secure for everyone. Intel Security is a division of Intel Corporation. Learn more at www.intelsecurity.com.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

No computer system can be absolutely secure.

The post New Intel Security Cloud Report Reveals IT Departments Find It Hard to Keep the Cloud Safe appeared first on Intel Newsroom.