Survey Claims Women Economists Still Victims of Sexism in the Workplace

Women may be fearless, but they’re still discriminated against in the workplace. A new survey by the American Economic Association (AEA) reveals that the professional climate for female economists remains a bit chilly despite the strides that corporate America is making toward a more level playing field. The AEA canvassed tens of thousands of economists between year-end 2018 and early 2019, more than 9,000 of whom completed the survey. Results suggest that the field of economics has some work to do. We’re Way Behind Close to three-quarters of women economists polled have felt their work has not been taken as

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Intel Celebrates Women in Technology at Grace Hopper Conference

Just as imagining the future and solving problems require diversity of thought and authentic perspectives, we at Intel believe that diversity and inclusion are essential for innovation and growth. An absence of perspectives limits our ability to understand and design for our own customers, and undermines our continued relevance and growth as an industry.

WhiteHouseDiversitySummitReversing the gender imbalance in the technology industry is a crucial component of Intel’s Diversity in Technology initiative, announced in January 2015. In February 2016, Intel announced 100 percent gender pay parity in its workforce which was maintained as of the 2016 mid-year report. The mid-year 2016 report, released in August, also revealed that an increase of female representation to 25.4 percent in the U.S. workforce (one of the highest figures in recent years), increase of technical female representation to 21.2 percent, and that women represented 42.9 percent of new leadership (VP-level and above) hires in first half 2016. In August, Intel signed the Equal Pay Pledge to commit to take action to advance equal pay.

Intel has long focused on creating a flexible place to work so that women feel supported in maintaining a healthy work/life balance while pursuing their careers. Programs such as eight weeks paid bonding leave for parents, split sabbaticals and doubled reimbursement for emergency back-up childcare and near-site childcare centers, have long been in place. Additional programs include competitive fertility and adoption benefit coverage and protégé programs to connect female leadership with female staff to guide their professional development and serve as an advocate for progressing their career.

Each October, technology companies worldwide come together to honor the achievements and encourage the aspirations of women technologists at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. Presented by the Anita Borg Institute and Association of Computing Machinery, the conference serves as a focal point to recognize critical contributions women have made to computing, to discuss the progress our industry has made toward becoming more diverse and inclusive, and in doing so, to challenge ourselves to perform even better. The industry still has a long way to go, but the collective efforts of technology companies, diversity advocates, and support at the national level are instrumental to inciting this type of change.

At Intel, we look forward to participating in the celebration and furthering the discussion around women in the tech industry:

  • On Thursday, Oct. 20, at 11:15am-11:45am CT, Chief Executive Officer Brian Krzanich will speak in a fireside chat at the Technical Executive Forum on Intel’s goal to reach full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in its U.S. workforce by 2020. He will include a candid exploration of the learnings, progress and unexpected challenges.
  • Later that day, in a plenary session from 4:00-5:00pm CT, Brian and Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer Danielle Brown will discuss Intel’s journey and strategy to achieve its 2020 goal, since the kickoff in January 2015. They will touch on the challenges that Intel and the larger tech industry face in the endeavor to change this landscape, as well as provide perspective on hiring and retention, the STEM pipeline, and the evolution that is required for a company where women and underrepresented minorities can thrive.
  • Intel also will have speakerships and presentations from Aicha Evans, Diversity & Inclusion Executive Champion and Corporate Vice President, Bing Hu, Principal Research Scientist, Carmen Badea, Software Engineer, Eve Schooler, Director in the Internet of Things Group, Rita Wouhaybi, System Architect, and Vida Ilderem, Vice President of Intel Labs.
  • Additionally, Intel was included on the Anita Borg Institute’s 2016 Top Companies for Women Technologists Leadership Index. This national program recognizes companies committed to building workplaces where women in technology roles can thrive.

With Intel’s longstanding commitment to women in the technology industry, the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing serves as a key forum for continuing the conversation on these topics and for celebrating the women who contribute immeasurably to our field.

The post Intel Celebrates Women in Technology at Grace Hopper Conference appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Intel Celebrates Women in Technology at Grace Hopper Conference

Just as imagining the future and solving problems require diversity of thought and authentic perspectives, we at Intel believe that diversity and inclusion are essential for innovation and growth. An absence of perspectives limits our ability to understand and design for our own customers, and undermines our continued relevance and growth as an industry.

WhiteHouseDiversitySummitReversing the gender imbalance in the technology industry is a crucial component of Intel’s Diversity in Technology initiative, announced in January 2015. In February 2016, Intel announced 100 percent gender pay parity in its workforce which was maintained as of the 2016 mid-year report. The mid-year 2016 report, released in August, also revealed that an increase of female representation to 25.4 percent in the U.S. workforce (one of the highest figures in recent years), increase of technical female representation to 21.2 percent, and that women represented 42.9 percent of new leadership (VP-level and above) hires in first half 2016. In August, Intel signed the Equal Pay Pledge to commit to take action to advance equal pay.

Intel has long focused on creating a flexible place to work so that women feel supported in maintaining a healthy work/life balance while pursuing their careers. Programs such as eight weeks paid bonding leave for parents, split sabbaticals and doubled reimbursement for emergency back-up childcare and near-site childcare centers, have long been in place. Additional programs include competitive fertility and adoption benefit coverage and protégé programs to connect female leadership with female staff to guide their professional development and serve as an advocate for progressing their career.

Each October, technology companies worldwide come together to honor the achievements and encourage the aspirations of women technologists at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. Presented by the Anita Borg Institute and Association of Computing Machinery, the conference serves as a focal point to recognize critical contributions women have made to computing, to discuss the progress our industry has made toward becoming more diverse and inclusive, and in doing so, to challenge ourselves to perform even better. The industry still has a long way to go, but the collective efforts of technology companies, diversity advocates, and support at the national level are instrumental to inciting this type of change.

At Intel, we look forward to participating in the celebration and furthering the discussion around women in the tech industry:

  • On Thursday, Oct. 20, at 11:15am-11:45am CT, Chief Executive Officer Brian Krzanich will speak in a fireside chat at the Technical Executive Forum on Intel’s goal to reach full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in its U.S. workforce by 2020. He will include a candid exploration of the learnings, progress and unexpected challenges.
  • Later that day, in a plenary session from 4:00-5:00pm CT, Brian and Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer Danielle Brown will discuss Intel’s journey and strategy to achieve its 2020 goal, since the kickoff in January 2015. They will touch on the challenges that Intel and the larger tech industry face in the endeavor to change this landscape, as well as provide perspective on hiring and retention, the STEM pipeline, and the evolution that is required for a company where women and underrepresented minorities can thrive.
  • Intel also will have speakerships and presentations from Aicha Evans, Diversity & Inclusion Executive Champion and Corporate Vice President, Bing Hu, Principal Research Scientist, Carmen Badea, Software Engineer, Eve Schooler, Director in the Internet of Things Group, Rita Wouhaybi, System Architect, and Vida Ilderem, Vice President of Intel Labs.
  • Additionally, Intel was included on the Anita Borg Institute’s 2016 Top Companies for Women Technologists Leadership Index. This national program recognizes companies committed to building workplaces where women in technology roles can thrive.

With Intel’s longstanding commitment to women in the technology industry, the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing serves as a key forum for continuing the conversation on these topics and for celebrating the women who contribute immeasurably to our field.

The post Intel Celebrates Women in Technology at Grace Hopper Conference appeared first on Intel Newsroom.

Intel Signs White House Equal Pay Pledge

Today, Intel has the pleasure of joining 28 other companies in signing the White House Equal Pay Pledge, a pledge signed by over 50 companies to date. Launched at the 2015 United States of Women Summit on Women’s Equality Day, the pledge encourages U.S. companies to take action to advance equal pay and affirms the key role businesses play in reducing the pay gap.

WhiteHouseDiversitySummitFor Intel, signing the pledge is a natural extension of its longstanding commitment to pay employees fairly and equitably at all levels of the organization.

Intel’s leaders believe in driving accountability through data. Driving real progress requires looking at the hard facts and developing strategies to close any gaps. On the issue of pay parity, Intel holds itself accountable with an annual, comprehensive audit in the U.S. that analyzes employees’ pay by gender and ethnicity. In our 2015 Annual Report, Intel disclosed that it achieved 100 percent gender pay parity. And in 2016, the company extended the analysis to look at pay data across race and ethnicities. Intel achieved 99 percent pay equity for underrepresented minorities, a gap company leaders are committed to closing by the end of the year.

Intel’s commitment to equal pay, and to diversity and inclusion, comes from its conviction that reaching a critical mass of women and underrepresented minorities in our industry brings ample benefits to many, including increased innovation and a more diverse set of thoughts and perspectives.

Today’s news provides an opportunity to join others in pledging a commitment to equal pay, and reflect on the progress that Intel has made, as well as the challenges still ahead.

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Intel Releases 2016 Diversity in Technology Mid-Year Report

Intel Corporation today released its 2016 Diversity in Technology mid-year report, which illustrates its progress in the first half of this year toward its commitment to achieve full representation of women and underrepresented minorities (URMs) in its U.S. workforce by 2020.

The report shows that Intel’s hiring of underrepresented minorities is progressing in the right direction, while female representation and retention are trending positively. In addition, Intel created several new programs designed to improve retention of diverse talent and foster a culture of inclusion. For the first time, Intel has evaluated pay data across races/ethnicities achieving 99 percent pay equity for URMs, a gap that the company is working to close in second half of 2016.

Intel’s diversity and inclusion goals are backed by a $300 million Diversity in Technology Initiative that includes increasing the company’s spending with diverse suppliers, investing and transforming the education pipeline, and combating online harassment.

U.S. URM Hiring

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Chip Shot: Intel Named a Top Company by NAFE for 7th Year

Int_Dvrsty_WmnPrsntrIntel has been named among the “Top 60 Companies for Executive Women” by the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE) for the 7th year. The 2016 list celebrates American corporations that promote women to top executive positions and create cultures that foster talented women through programs and policies. Intel is committed to significantly increase hiring, retention and advancement of women in the tech industry and offers innovative programs that are uniquely designed to help women build meaningful lives and careers. Learn more about Intel’s diversity vision and goals.

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Blog: Shaping Tomorrow’s Generation of Engineers, Today

National Engineers Week is upon us, and it is a great time to raise awareness and interest in engineering and technology careers — and the possibilities that they offer. At Intel, technology and engineering are part of our DNA and we believe a diverse engineering workforce is critical to driving continued innovation and growth in … Continued

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Chip Shot: Intel 2015 Diversity and Inclusion Report Now Available

Intel’s 2015 Diversity and Inclusion Report shows the progress the company has made toward its goal of reaching full workforce representation of women and underrepresented minorities in its U.S. workforce by 2020. In 2015, Intel exceeded its annual hiring goal, achieving 43 percent diverse hiring, and reached 100 percent gender pay parity across U.S. job types and levels. Read more about the report and Intel’s diversity progress in a letter by Chief Diversity Officer Danielle Brown.

diversity-report-1024x512.jpg

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Chip Shot: Kim Stevenson Named NAFE Digital Trailblazer

Intel corporate vice president and CIO Kim Stevenson was honored today with the Women of Excellence Digital Trailblazer award by the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE). The Women of Excellence Awards recognizes the achievements of NAFE members in their careers and communities and winners are chosen annually for their vision, courage, compassion, successes and generosity. The Digital Trailblazer award is given to a woman who has harnessed the power of the Internet to improve women's businesses and lives.

Chip Shot: Kim Stevenson Named NAFE Digital Trailblazer

Intel corporate vice president and CIO Kim Stevenson was honored today with the Women of Excellence Digital Trailblazer award by the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE). The Women of Excellence Awards recognizes the achievements of NAFE members in their careers and communities and winners are chosen annually for their vision, courage, compassion, successes and generosity. The Digital Trailblazer award is given to a woman who has harnessed the power of the Internet to improve women's businesses and lives.