Brain Gain: ‘Virtual Neurons’ Power Drug Discovery for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s

More than 50 million people are afflicted with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases worldwide — a figure that’s growing as the average age of the global population rises. Yet effective treatments for nervous system disorders remain elusive due to the complexity of the human brain.

Drug development requires scientists to identify a molecule that interacts with a target protein and alters the progression of a disease. Though many researchers are hard at work to find cures for neurodegenerative disorders, it’s difficult to determine which biomarkers indicate how quickly the disease is progressing, or whether the drug is working.

NeuroInitiative, a startup with operations in Florida and Massachusetts, is using GPU computing to create simulations of neural pathways — in essence, a “virtual neuron” — to help researchers test hypotheses about how a potential drug molecule will interact with the body.

The simulations allow scientists to take a four-dimensional tour inside a virtual neuron and understand its complexity. They can also modify factors within the neuron, providing visual insight that helps researchers figure out which drugs could work best for particular patients.

“The biology of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases is incredibly dynamic and complex, which provides a great application for computer simulation,” said Andy Lee, co-founder and chief technology officer at NeuroInitiative. Speedups from NVIDIA GPUs allow “startups like us to tackle these critical medical needs.”

NeuroInitiative runs its simulations on NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs through the Microsoft Azure cloud platform. The software uses the NVIDIA CUDA toolkit, and cranks up to more than 100,000 CUDA cores during peak periods.

Harnessing NVIDIA GPUs in the cloud gives the researchers flexible, pay-as-you-go access to the virtual machines. They can crank up their usage during the most demanding simulations, then wind it down and spend weeks analyzing the results before gearing up for the next one.

NVIDIA GPUs allow them to perform compute-intensive simulations that could cut the 12-20 year drug development period for a new treatment in half, estimates Lee.

“We’re heading toward testing hypotheses in minutes, which speeds up the iteration of ideas and, ultimately, cures,” said Lee.

NeuroInitiative has already identified more than 25 promising drug candidates for Parkinson’s treatment that will be tested in the lab. The top compounds could be ready for human clinical trials in just three years, he estimates.

Lee said virtualized GPUs have allowed his team “to scale in minutes to levels which just a few years ago would have required access to a handful of supercomputers around the world.”

To learn more, watch Lee’s GTC talk, Identifying New Therapeutics for Parkinson’s Disease.

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NVIDIA Virtual GPU Brings Autodesk Around the World in Minutes

Mary Poppins might’ve been able to fit a coat rack, wall mirror and potted plant in her handbag. You’d have to be just as magical to try packing up a workstation and transporting it across the country.

Until now, developers at Autodesk, whose software is used by 200 million customers to design virtually everything, have had to grapple with a similar problem.

With more than 200 million customers — including design professionals, engineers, architects, digital artists, and students — Autodesk develops software for people who make things. However, to support rigorous testing requirements across a variety of operating systems and product versions, many developers needed up to three workstations under their desks.

Now, with NVIDIA’s virtual GPUs, Autodesk’s developers and sales technicians can access all their applications and products anywhere in the world, thousands of miles from where code might be housed, in just minutes.

Optimizing Resources

A look into Autodesk’s resource usage statistics show that developers only used 50 percent of their graphics resources in their development cycle. Workstations for high-end rendering and graphics testing often sat idle for weeks at a time.

Before adopting NVIDIA GPUs, sales technicians had to carry two expensive, heavy laptops, each with an integrated graphics card, just to be able to run Autodesk software. Even then, the graphics cards didn’t support the best experience on a laptop, so the second laptop served as a backup in case the first didn’t work.

Searching for a fix, the team turned to NVIDIA to better optimize the use of their resources by setting up a virtual desktop infrastructure. Depending on developers’ workflows, their graphics requirements for storage differed. With NVIDIA vGPU management and monitoring capabilities, Autodesk could assign computing resources based on differing compute and graphics requirements.

Due to scalability problems and long wait times for hardware, Autodesk also hoped to test a cloud-deployed virtualized solution — the Mary Poppins bag for applications. This led to CloudPC, which uses both Quadro vDWS and NVIDIA GRID to create a virtualized environment that allows developers to access applications the moment they get to their desktops.

Code that used to take up to 12 hours to access now only takes minutes to download. Support engineers, who are often on the road, can connect and resolve issues from anywhere.

“The biggest value NVIDIA brings to Autodesk is the ability to resolve and share access to the right compute resources,” said Rachel O’Gorman, leader of the Desktop Virtualization Services team for Autodesk’s CloudPC.

Autodesk developers report having the same capabilities on virtual desktops as they did with workstations, but now have increased accessibility to software.

“The virtualized desktops not only replace and augment the physical workstations,” said O’Gorman. “The VDI environment lets us optimize resource consumption, reduce maintenance and management work, and increase productivity for our developers and technical sales teams.”

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How AI and Deep Learning Will Enable Cancer Diagnosis Via Ultrasound

Viksit Kumar didn’t know his mother had ovarian cancer until it had reached its third stage, too late for chemotherapy to be effective.

She died in a hospital in Mumbai, India, in 2006, but might have lived years longer if her cancer had been detected earlier.

This knowledge ate at the mechanical engineering student, spurring him to choose a different path.

“That was one of the driving factors for me to move into the medical field,” said Kumar, now a senior research fellow at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. He hopes that the work his mom’s death inspired will help others to avoid her fate.

For the past few years, Kumar has been leading an effort to use GPU-powered deep learning to more accurately diagnose cancers sooner using ultrasound images.

The work has focused on breast cancer (which is much more prevalent than ovarian cancer and attracts more funding), with the primary aim of enabling earlier diagnoses in developing countries, where mammograms are rare.

Into the Deep End of Deep Learning

Kumar came to this work soon after joining the Mayo Clinic. At the time, he was working with ultrasound images for diagnosing pre-term birth complications. When he noticed that ultrasounds were picking up different objects, he figured that they might be useful for classifying breast cancer images.

As he looked closer at the issue, he deduced that deep learning would be a good match. However, at the time, Kumar knew very little about deep learning. So he dove in, spending more than six months teaching himself everything he could about building and working with deep learning models.

“There was a drive behind that learning: This was a tool that could really help,” he said.

And help is needed. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers, and one of the easiest to detect. However, in developing countries, mammogram machines are hard to find outside of large cities, primarily due to cost. As a result, health care providers often take a conservative approach and perform unnecessary biopsies.

Ultrasound offers a much more affordable option for far-flung facilities, which could lead to more women being referred for mammograms in large cities.

Even in developed countries, where most women have regular mammograms after the age of 40, Kumar said ultrasound could prove critical for diagnosing women who are pregnant or are planning to get pregnant, and who can’t be exposed to a mammogram’s X-rays.

Mayo Clinic ultrasound deep learning research
The red outline shows the manually segmented boundary of a carcinoma, while the deep learning-predicted boundaries are shown in blue, green and cyan. © 2018 Kumar et al. under Creative Commons Attribution License.

 

Getting Better All the Time

Kumar is amazed at how far the deep learning tools have already progressed. It used to take two or three days for him to configure a system for deep learning, and now takes as little as a couple of hours.

Kumar’s team does its local processing using the TensorFlow deep learning framework container from NVIDIA GPU Cloud (NGC) on NVIDIA TITAN and GeForce GPUs. For the heaviest lifting, the work shifts to NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs on Amazon Web Services, using the same container from NGC.

The NGC containers are optimized to deliver maximum performance on NVIDIA Volta and Pascal architecture GPUs on-premises and in the cloud, and include everything needed to run GPU-accelerated software. And using the same container for both environments allows them to run jobs everywhere they have compute resources.

“Once we have the architecture developed and we want to iterate on the process, then we go to AWS,” said Kumar, estimating that doing so is at least eight times faster than processing larger jobs locally, thanks to the greater number of more advanced GPUs in play.

The team currently does both training and inference on the same GPUs. Kumar said he wants to do inference on an ultrasound machine in live mode.

More Progress Coming

Kumar hopes to start applying the technique on live patient trials within the next year.

Eventually, he hopes his team’s work enables ultrasound images to be used in early detection of other cancers, such as thyroid and, naturally, ovarian cancer.

As groundbreaking as his work is, Kumar urges patience when it comes to applying AI and deep learning in the medical field. “It needs to be a mature technology before it can be accepted as a clinical standard by radiologists and sonographers,” he said.

Work like Kumar’s is certainly helping to push that along.

Read Kumar’s paper, “Automated and real-time segmentation of suspicious breast masses using convolutional neural network.” 

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Intel Reimagines Data Center Storage with new 3D NAND SSDs

In 2017, Intel brought to market a wide array of products designed to tackle the world’s growing stockpile of data. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich called data an “unseen driving force behind the next-generation technology revolution,” and Rob Crooke, senior vice president and general manager of the Non-Volatile Memory (NVM) Solutions Group at Intel, recently outlined his vision for how storage and memory technologies can address all that data. In the past year, Intel introduced new Intel® Optane™ technology-based products and will continue to deliver exciting, blazing-fast solutions based on this breakthrough technology, with announcements later this year. Intel also brought industry-leading areal density to storage for consumers and enterprises, driving both capacity and form factor innovation with Intel® 3D NAND storage products.

Intel is reimagining how data is stored for the data center. By driving the creation and adoption of compelling new form factors, like the EDSFF 1U long and 1U short, and delivering advanced materials, including our densest NAND to date with 64-layer TLC Intel 3D NAND, Intel is enabling capacities of 8TB and beyond in an array of form factors that meet the specific performance needs of data centers.

The Intel SSD DC P4500 Series comes in the ruler form factor, wh

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Introducing Intel SSD DC P4510 and P4511 Series

Today, Intel announced the Intel SSD DC P4510 Series for data center applications. The P4510 Series uses 64-layer TLC Intel 3D NAND to enable end users to do more per server, support broader workloads and deliver space-efficient capacity. The P4510 Series enables up to four times more terabytes per server and delivers up to 10 times better random read latency at 99.99 percent quality of service than previous generations. The drive can also deliver up to double the input-output operations per second (IOPS) per terabyte. The 1 and 2TB capacities have been shipping to cloud service providers (CSPs) in high volume since August 2017, and the 4 and 8TB capacities are now available to CSPs and channel customers. All capacities are in the 2.5-inch 15 mm U.2 form factor and utilize a PCIe* NVMe* 3.0 x4 connection.

To accelerate performance and simplify management of the P4510 Series PCIe SSDs and other PCIe SSDs, Intel is also delivering two new technologies that work together to replace legacy storage hardware. Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors include Intel Volume Management Device (VMD), enabling robust management such as surprise insertion/removal and LED management of PCIe SSDs directly connected to the CPU. Building on this functionality, Intel® Virtual RAID on CPU (VROC) uses Intel VMD to provide RAID to PCIe SSDs. By replacing RAID cards with Intel VROC, customers are able to enjoy up to twice the IOPs performance and up to a 70 percent cost savings with PCIe SSDs directly attached to the CPU, improving customer’s return on their investments in SSD-based storage.

Intel is also bringing innovation to the data center with new low-power SSDs and the Enterprise and Datacenter SSD Form Factor (EDSFF). The Intel SSD DC P4511 Series offers a low-power option for workloads with lower performance requirements, enabling data centers to save power. The P4511 Series will be available later in the first half of 2018 in M.2 110 mm form factor. Additionally, Intel continues to drive form factor innovation in the data center, with the Intel SSD DC P4510 Series available in the future in EDSFF 1U long and 1U short with up to 1 petabyte (PB) of storage in a 1U server rack.

EDSFF Momentum

At Flash Memory Summit* 2017, Intel introduced the ruler form factor for Intel SSDs, purpose-built from the ground up for data center efficiency and free from the confines of legacy form factors. The new form factor delivers unprecedented storage density, system design flexibility with long and short versions, optimum thermal efficiency, scalable performance (available x4, x8 and x16 connectors) and easy maintenance, with front-load, hot-swap capabilities. EDSFF is also future-ready and designed for PCIe 3.0, available today, and PCIe 4.0 and 5.0, when they are ready.

Recently, the Enterprise and Datacenter SSD Form Factor specification was ratified by the EDSFF Working Group*, which includes Intel®, Samsung*, Microsoft*, Facebook* and others. Intel has been shipping a pre-spec version of the Intel SSD DC P4500 Series to select customers, including IBM* and Tencent*, for more than a year, and the Intel SSD DC P4510 Series will be available in EDSFF 1U long and 1U short starting in the second half of 2018. The industry has shown an overwhelmingly positive response to the Intel-inspired EDSFF specifications, with more than 10 key OEM, ODM and ecosystem members indicating intentions to design EDSFF SSDs into their systems. Additional SSD manufactures have also expressed intent to deliver EDSFF SSDs in the future.

IBM has deployed the P4500 Series in this new form factor to the IBM cloud. Tencent, a leading provider of value-added internet services in the world, has incorporated Intel® SSD DC P4500 series in the “ruler” form factor into its newly announced T-Flex platform, which supports 32 “ruler” SSDs as the standard high-performance storage resource pool.

“‘Ruler’ optimizes heat dissipation, significantly enhances SSD serviceability and delivers amazing storage capacity that will scale to 1PB in 1U in the future, thereby reducing overall storage construction and operating costs,” said Wu Jianjian, product director of Blackstone Product Center, Tencent Cloud. “We are very excited about this modern design and encourage its adoption as an industry standard specification.”

For more information on the Intel SSD DC P4510 Series, EDSFF and Intel 3D NAND, visit Intel’s solid state drive site.

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Oracle Supercharges Its Cloud Offerings with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs

Oracle announced today that it’s bringing the power of our latest Tesla GPU accelerators to its public cloud.

Speaking this morning at Oracle OpenWorld, Don Johnson, the company’s senior vice president of product development, said that Oracle Cloud customers can access NVIDIA Tesla P100 GPU accelerators, starting today. Additionally, he said Oracle will expand its cloud offerings to include Tesla V100 GPUs, the most powerful data center GPUs, based on our latest Volta architecture.

The move underscores growing demand for public-cloud access to our GPU computing platform from an increasingly wide set of enterprise users. Oracle’s massive customer base means that a broad range of businesses across many industries will have access to accelerated computing to harness the power of AI, accelerated analytics and high performance computing.

“We’re working closely with NVIDIA to provide the next generation of accelerated computing to enterprises worldwide using our X7 compute architecture,” said Kash Ifikhar, vice president of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. “This provides incredible flexibility to data scientists, engineers and researchers, allowing them to rent cutting-edge AI and HPC supercomputers by the hour to solve challenges of exceptional complexity.”

Oracle’s NVIDIA P100 offering provides its users two P100 GPUs with NVIDIA NVLink high-speed interconnect technology and can deliver 21 teraflops of single-precision performance per instance — the kind of performance required for deep learning training and inferencing, accelerated analytics and high performance computing.

Each P100 cloud instance can deliver the performance of up to 25 non-accelerated servers, dramatically saving money for HPC and AI workloads.

“Accelerated computing is powering a revolution in AI, HPC and enterprise computing,” said Ian Buck, vice president of Accelerated Computing at NVIDIA. “Now with NVIDIA GPUs, the Oracle Cloud brings that computation power to its customers worldwide.”

Reducing Model Training from Weeks to Days

One of the first to access the new NVIDIA GPU offering from Oracle Cloud is Fluent.ai. Inc. — a member of NVIDIA’s Inception program for AI startups. Fluent.ai offers the world’s first acoustic-only speech recognition technology to OEMs wanting to make their consumer electronics voice enabled.

Fluent.ai’s proprietary neural network algorithms learn to understand meaning directly from a user’s speech. The result is a highly flexible, accessible and accurate voice-interface technology that performs robustly even in offline and noisy environments — in any language or with any accent.

“Running on new NVIDIA GPU instances has significantly optimized the training of our deep learning models compared to the previous-generation hardware,” said Vikrant Tomar, chief technology officer at Fluent.ai. “This allows us to train more sophisticated speech recognition models while reducing the overall job time from weeks to days.”

And, cloud customers will be able to glean even more performance and cost-savings from our new NVIDIA V100 GPUs. With more than 120 teraflops of deep learning performance per GPU, a single Volta GPU offers the equivalent performance of 100 CPUs.

With the benefits of our GPU computing platform available to an even wider audience, expect to be amazed by a new wave of solutions for problems not yet solved.

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Award-Winning VFX Studio MPC Turns NVIDIA GRID into a Star

You may have seen the work of leading visual effects studio MPC in movies such as The Jungle Book, Wonder Woman, Alien: Covenant and Pirates of the Caribbean. Now the latest name MPC is turning into a star is NVIDIA GRID.

MPC (Moving Picture Company), a subsidiary of Technicolor and a global leader in visual effects for over 25 years, has deployed NVIDIA GRID to ensure they can keep connected, and creative, wherever they are in the world.

“As a VFX supervisor on large feature films, I need immediate access to my team’s work at all times,” said Greg Butler, an award-winning VFX supervisor with MPC. “Whether I’m on location for the shoot, in Los Angeles for client meetings or at home strategizing, NVIDIA technology helps me to keep my projects moving forward.”

The Show Must Go On

MPC’s work has been recognized with numerous awards, including the Best Visual Effects Oscar for their work on Life of Pi and The Jungle Book.

For MPC to deliver on these graphically demanding projects, they need fast, reliable and flexible access to graphic-intensive software on mobile devices. No small undertaking, but NVIDIA GRID is there to support them.

Thanks to deploying GRID Virtual Workstation software on NVIDIA Tesla M60-based servers in five locations around the world, the MPC team is able to provide remote access to their production platform, reviewTool. Mobile users can easily access Linux-based applications on the go, completely securely, with no reduction in performance – even on location in the desert.

MPC won the Best Visual Effects Oscar for The Jungle Book. Photo courtesy of MPC Film.

No Creative Limits

NVIDIA GRID enables the MPC production teams to work in a way that wasn’t possible before. Now, they can more easily work as a global team and enjoy the same performance levels wherever they are.

“MPC’s reviewTool makes it possible to see everything happening on a show across the globe. Running reviewTool through NVIDIA GRID means the content is always available and secure, freeing me to work remotely,” Butler said.

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How Intuit’s TurboTax Used NVIDIA GRID to Make Tax Season Easier for Millions

Gamers use GPUs to make slaying zombies more fun. During the latest tax season, the tens of millions of people who rely on Intuit were able to use GPUs to slay their taxes a little more easily, too.

That’s because Intuit’s TurboTax SmartLook feature — powered by Tesla M60 GPU accelerators and NVIDIA GRID — lets you communicate live, via one-way video, with credentialed CPAs or enrolled agents around the country.

TurboTax SmartLook on mobile
Tax help when you need it: TurboTax SmartLook on mobile.

Using SmartLook, tax experts on virtualized desktops can view your screen to help you through the next step. They can even draw on your screen to highlight key fields.

Data remains securely in Intuit’s data center the whole time. Intuit streams the application via Citrix XenApp 7.9 with NVIDIA GRID virtualization software and NVIDIA Tesla M60 GPU accelerators running on Dell R730 servers.

“The new SmartLook feature has been rolled out to thousands of experts and makes it possible for Intuit to offer a new category of tax advisory services to our customers,” says Bill Schuller, a contact center domain architect at Intuit. “There is no room for a poor user experience. Using NVIDIA GRID vGPU combined with the Tesla M60, we’re able to provide optimal video performance.”

With the ability to serve 32 users per board, the Tesla M60 also increased user density. So Intuit can put more experts online, with fewer servers. The vGPU enables twice as many experts as a CPU-only server setup. It even reduces CPU workloads on standard web browsers.

The secure computing environment centralizes network access giving Intuit visibility, and auditability, of their field experts’ work.

Learn more from Intuit’s Schuller during our GPU Technology Conference, taking place through May 11 in San Jose, Calif.

And check out Intuit’s ad campaign for SmartLook, featuring Academy Award-winning actress Kathy Bates.

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GPUs Everywhere: New Instances in Microsoft Azure Cloud

Simulating protein molecules. Self-driving cars. Seismic exploration. Researchers and businesses have many choices to tackle these challenges with NVIDIA GPU computing.

The NVIDIA accelerated computing platform is accessible for the most demanding workloads from data centers or in the cloud. Today, researchers have another great option: GPU computing in the cloud with Microsoft Azure’s new instances.

Whether they’re sequencing DNA or providing real-time language translation, people using GPU computing in the cloud can accelerate their work, and scale it up or down on demand.

The City of Hope in Los Angeles is one such example. A team of computer scientists led by Dr. Nagarajan Vaidehi, director of the Computational Therapeutics Core at the medical research and treatment center, performs molecular modeling to better understand diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

To design drugs, Vaidehi’s team screens millions of protein molecules in 3D and performs related calculations to understand the shapes of specific candidates.

While the researchers focus their science at the molecular level of life, and the drugs that might sustain it, they’re increasingly putting their data in the cloud. Using Microsoft Azure virtual machines with NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators, they can scale up their computing needs to handle bigger simulations faster — and trim simulation times from weeks to days.

By using GPU resources in Azure, we can run simulations in days that would take a month on CPU-based machines.

— Nagarajan Vaidehi, City of Hope.

Accelerated Computing in the Cloud

Fighting disease is just one example of how Microsoft Azure customers use GPUs in the cloud. Other customers handle everything from high-performance compute workloads for DNA sequencing to rendering visual effects for Hollywood blockbusters.

For traditional high performance computing, Microsoft is offering its new Microsoft Azure NC Instances, powered by our Pascal architecture-based NVIDIA Tesla P100 GPU accelerators. The new instances provide double the performance of the current generation. This is huge for customers like City of Hope, because the quicker they can perform their simulations, the more progress they can make toward effectively treating diseases.

And with the explosive growth of AI and deep learning, customers are now training neural networks for everything from natural language processing to autonomous vehicles. To meet this increased demand, Microsoft is adding new ND Instances with NVIDIA Tesla P40 GPU accelerators. These offer more than double the performance over the previous generations for workloads using Microsoft’s Cognitive Toolkit, TensorFlow and other deep learning frameworks.

With ND Instances, people can work with bigger models, thanks to the 24GB of memory on each Tesla P40, and they run large-scale training and inference jobs across hundreds of GPUs.

“The power of Azure virtual machines combined with NVIDIA’s GPU accelerators enables massive scale and speed across the most performance-intensive workloads,” said Corey Sanders, director of compute at Azure. “With NVIDIA, we are using cutting-edge technology to further our mission — helping our customers achieve more with our cloud.”

The new Azure instances will be available in preview later in the year. Customers can sign up here.

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Intel Launches Cloud-Inspired 3D NAND SSDs for Data Centers

3D NAND SSD
The Intel SSD DC P4600 Series is one of two new 3D NAND solid state drives for data centers announced by Intel Corporation on May 2, 2017. The SSD DC P4600 Series accelerates caching and enables more workloads per server. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Today, Intel announced two new Intel® 3D NAND solid state drives for data centers, the Intel® SSD DC P4500 Series and Intel® SSD DC P4600 Series, along with reinforcing its commitment to expanding 3D NAND supply.

The latest additions to the Intel SSD Family for Data Center have been designed from the ground up for cloud storage solutions, including software defined storage and converged infrastructure. The Intel SSD DC P4500 Series, optimized for reads, enables data centers to get more value out of servers and store more data. Designed for mixed workloads, the Intel SSD DC P4600 Series accelerates caching and enables more workloads per server.

The Intel SSD DC P4500 Series and P4600 Series pair Intel’s triple level cell (TLC) 3D NAND that delivers industry-leading density with an all-new Intel-developed controller, unique firmware innovations and PCIe/NVMe. The new data center SSDs deliver a blend of performance, capacity, manageability and reliability, and they offer game-changing value to data centers. These unique features will accelerate the move to software defined storage with effective scaling, increase efficiency of data centers and reduce the total cost of ownership while improving service levels. Initially, the Intel SSD DC P4500 Series and P4600 Series will launch in a half-height half-length add-in card and U.2 2.5-inch form factors in 1, 2 and 4TB capacities.

Intel is also expanding Fab 68 in Dalian, China, increasing its 3D NAND supply to better meet the storage needs of customers. In October 2015, Intel announced an investment in Fab 68 and converted the facility to produce 3D NAND.

To read more about Intel 3D NAND, Intel SSDs for Data Center and the new Intel SSD DC P4500 Series and P4600 Series, including features and performance, visit Intel’s solid state drives website.

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Intel Launches Cloud-Inspired 3D NAND SSDs for Data Centers

3D NAND SSD
The Intel SSD DC P4600 Series is one of two new 3D NAND solid state drives for data centers announced by Intel Corporation on May 2, 2017. The SSD DC P4600 Series accelerates caching and enables more workloads per server. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Today, Intel announced two new Intel® 3D NAND solid state drives for data centers, the Intel® SSD DC P4500 Series and Intel® SSD DC P4600 Series, along with reinforcing its commitment to expanding 3D NAND supply.

The latest additions to the Intel SSD Family for Data Center have been designed from the ground up for cloud storage solutions, including software defined storage and converged infrastructure. The Intel SSD DC P4500 Series, optimized for reads, enables data centers to get more value out of servers and store more data. Designed for mixed workloads, the Intel SSD DC P4600 Series accelerates caching and enables more workloads per server.

The Intel SSD DC P4500 Series and P4600 Series pair Intel’s triple level cell (TLC) 3D NAND that delivers industry-leading density with an all-new Intel-developed controller, unique firmware innovations and PCIe/NVMe. The new data center SSDs deliver a blend of performance, capacity, manageability and reliability, and they offer game-changing value to data centers. These unique features will accelerate the move to software defined storage with effective scaling, increase efficiency of data centers and reduce the total cost of ownership while improving service levels. Initially, the Intel SSD DC P4500 Series and P4600 Series will launch in a half-height half-length add-in card and U.2 2.5-inch form factors in 1, 2 and 4TB capacities.

Intel is also expanding Fab 68 in Dalian, China, increasing its 3D NAND supply to better meet the storage needs of customers. In October 2015, Intel announced an investment in Fab 68 and converted the facility to produce 3D NAND.

To read more about Intel 3D NAND, Intel SSDs for Data Center and the new Intel SSD DC P4500 Series and P4600 Series, including features and performance, visit Intel’s solid state drives website.

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